Courses for Fall 2020

Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ANEL 440-401 1st Year Akkadian I Joshua A. Jeffers MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Introduction to the grammar of the Akkadian language with emphasis on developing skills in the cuneiform writing system and reading of selected texts. ANEL640401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ANEL440401
ANEL 563-401 Old Egyptian David P Silverman MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is an introduction to the language of the Egyptian Old Kingdom. The grammar of the period will be introduced during the early part of the semester, using Ededl's ALTAGYPTISCHE GRAMMATIK as the basic reference. Other grammatical studies to be utilized will include works by Allen, Baer, Polotsky, Satzinger, Gilula, Doret, and Silverman. The majority of time in the course will be devoted to reading varied textual material: the unpublished inscriptions in the tomb of the Old Kingdom offical Kapure--on view in the collection of the University Museum; several autobiographical inscriptions as recorded by Sethe in URKUNDEN I; and a letter in hieratic (Baer, ZAS 93, 1966, 1-9). AFRC563401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ANEL563401
ANEL 640-401 1st Year Akkadian I Joshua A. Jeffers MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Introduction to the grammar of the Akkadian language with emphasis on developing skills in the cuneiform writing system and reading of selected texts. ANEL440401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ANEL640401
ANEL 646-001 Sumerian Relig/Magc Txts Stephen J. Tinney This self-contained course sets the Sumerian language, writing system and use of writing in their social and historical context. The aim is to provide students of ancient history and culture from diverse disciplines with a good grounding in Sumerian culture, familiarity with the Sumerian language and cuneiform writing system and the requisite knowledge for critical assessment of published translations and of the secondary literature. The course is organized as two threads, culture on the one hand and language on the other. The two threads are united by taking examples in the language exercises, vocabulary assignments, etc., as far as possible from the domain of the week' cultural topics. The net effect is to examine the culture both through contemporary secondary literature and through direct contact with elementary primary texts of relevance to the various topics of discussion. The language component of the course will be carried out in a combination of transliteration and cuneiform, with an expectation that all students will gain familiarity with at least the core 80 syllabic signs, and about 100 additional logographic signs. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ANEL 740-001 Akkad Relig/Scien Txts Joshua A. Jeffers Readings in Akkadian of religious and scientific texts from ancient Mesopotamia. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ANEL740001
ARAB 031-401 Elementary Arabic I Emad El-Din Rushdie Ahmed MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB631401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARAB 031-402 Elementary Arabic I Michael Raish MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB631402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARAB 031-403 Elementary Arabic I Michael Raish MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB631403 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARAB 033-401 Intermediate Arabic III MBArek Sryfi MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
This is the continuation of the Elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students range from Intermediate Low to Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. ARAB633401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ARAB033401
ARAB 033-402 Intermediate Arabic III Emad El-Din Rushdie Ahmed MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This is the continuation of the Elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students range from Intermediate Low to Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. ARAB633402 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARAB 035-401 Adv Intermed Arabic I MBArek Sryfi MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM
TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM
This is a proficiency-based course which builds on the lessons from Intermediate Arabic. Emphasis continues to be on all four language skills: Speaking, Listening, Reading, & Writing. The readings for the class are chosen from actual texts from both medieval and modern Arabic in a variety of fields and subjects. Students will be expected to give classroom presentations and to write short essays in Arabic. Evaluation will be both Achievement- and proficiency- based. ARAB635401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ARAB035401
ARAB 432-401 Arab Belles-Lettres Huda Fakhreddine TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course aims to improve reading skills and vocabulary by introducing students to extensive passages taken from a variety of Arabic literary genres from all periods. Taught in MSA with writing assignments in MSA. COML432401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ARAB432401
ARAB 436-301 Intr Pre-Mod Arabic Txts Joseph E. Lowry This course aims to provide incoming graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with an introduction to issues in Arabic grammar and syntax that commonly arise in pre-modern Arabic texts. Students will also be introduced to, and expected to consult, the standard reference works used as aids in reading such texts. Students will be expected to prepare a text or set of texts assigned by the instructor for each session. It is intended that, upon completion of this course, students will be able to work independently with a wide variety of pre-modern Arabic texts. Although the texts in this course are pre-modern, the course reinforces MSA reading skills. May be taken twice for credit with instructors permission. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ARAB436301
ARAB 580-401 Reading Arabic Manuscrpt Ali B. Ali-Dinar W 05:00 PM-08:00 PM Arabic language is used by many societies not only in communication but also in correspondence and in documenting the affairs of their daily lives. Arabic script is adopted by many groups whose native languages are not Arabic, in writing their languages before some moved to the Roman alphabet. In many historical documents specific style of writing and handwriting are dominant. This specificity is influenced by the dialectical variations, the historical development of each region and the level of Arabic literacy and use. The aims of this course which will focus on the Arabic writing tradition of Africa and the Middle East are as follows: (1) Reading and interpreting hand-written Arabic documents from Africa and the Middle East with focus on different historical eras. (2) In-depth understanding of the historical and language contexts of the selected documents. (3) Examining different handwriting styles that are in vogue in Africa and the Middle East. AFRC509401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ARAB580401
ARAB 631-401 Elementary Arabic I Emad El-Din Rushdie Ahmed MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
This is the beginner course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course (ARAB 002) students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB031401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARAB 631-402 Elementary Arabic I Michael Raish MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
This is the beginner course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course (ARAB 002) students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB031402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARAB 631-403 Elementary Arabic I Michael Raish MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This is the beginner course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course (ARAB 002) students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB031403 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARAB 633-401 Intermediate Arabic III MBArek Sryfi MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
This is the continuation of the Elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. This is the continuation of ARAB031 and ARAB 032, the elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. As in ARAB 031-032, evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students range from Intermediate Low to Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB033401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ARAB633401
ARAB 633-402 Intermediate Arabic III Emad El-Din Rushdie Ahmed MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This is the continuation of the Elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. This is the continuation of ARAB031 and ARAB 032, the elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. As in ARAB 031-032, evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students range from Intermediate Low to Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB033402 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
ARAB 635-401 Adv Intermed Arabic I MBArek Sryfi MW 10:00 AM-11:00 AM
TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM
This is a proficiency-based course which continues from the first intermediate course, ARAB 033/034. Emphasis continues to be on all four language skills: Speaking, Listening, Reading, & Writing. The readings for the class are chosen from actual texts from both medieval and modern Arabic in a variety of fields and subjects. Students will be expected to give classroom presentations and to write short essays in Arabic. Evaluation will be both Achievement- and proficiency- based. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB035401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=ARAB635401
HEBR 051-401 Elem Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. A grade of B- or higher is needed to continue in the language. JWST051401, HEBR651401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR051401
HEBR 051-402 Elem Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. A grade of B- or higher is needed to continue in the language. JWST051402, HEBR651402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR051402
HEBR 052-401 Elem Modern Hebrew II Ibrahim Miari MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
A continuation of first semester Elementary Modern Hebrew, which assumes basic skills of reading and speaking and the use of the present tense. Open to all students who have completed one semester of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST052401, HEBR652401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR052401
HEBR 053-401 Intrm Modern Hebrew III Liora Tamir MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST053401, HEBR653401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR053401
HEBR 053-402 Intrm Modern Hebrew III Joseph L Benatov MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST053402, HEBR653402 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR053402
HEBR 054-401 Intrm Modern Hebrew IV Joseph L Benatov MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
This course constitutes the final semester of Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Hence, one of the main goals of the course is to prepare the students for the proficiency exam in Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar skills and ability to read literary texts. Open to all students who have completed three semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST054401, HEBR654401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR054401
HEBR 151-401 Elem Biblical Hebrew I Michael A. Carasik MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course is an introduction to Biblical Hebrew. It assumes no prior knowledge, but students who can begin to acquire a reading knowledge of the Hebrew alphabet before class starts will find it extremely helpful. The course is the 1st of a 4-semester sequence whose purpose is to prepare students to take courses in Bible that demand a familiarity with the original language of the text. JWST471401, JWST171401, HEBR451401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR151401
HEBR 153-401 Intermed Bibl Hebrew I: Intro Bibl Hebrew Prose Michael A. Carasik MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course will focus on using the grammar and vocabulary learned at the introductory level to enable students to read Biblical texts independently and take advanced Bible exegesis courses. We will also work on getting comfortable with the standard dictionaries, concordances, and grammars used by scholars of the Bible. We will concentrate on prose this semester, closely reading Ruth, Jonah, and other prose selections. We will begin to translate from English into Biblical Hebrew, and there will also be a unit on the punctuation marks used in the Bible. This is a suitable entry point for students who already have strong Hebrew skills. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permisison of instructor required. Sucessful completion of HEBR 152 or permission of the instructor. This course is the prerequisite for HEBR 154 (no one is "permitted" into that smester; you must take the previous semester course). JWST473401, JWST173401, HEBR453401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR153401
HEBR 451-401 Elem Biblical Hebrew I Michael A. Carasik MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course is an introduction to Biblical Hebrew. It assumes no prior knowledge, but students who can begin to acquire a reading knowledge of the Hebrew alphabet before class starts will find it extremely helpful. The course is the 1st of a 4-semester sequence whose purpose is to prepare students to take courses in Bible that demand a familiarity with the original language of the text. JWST471401, JWST171401, HEBR151401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR451401
HEBR 453-401 Intermed Bibl Hebrew I: Intro Bibl Hebrew Prose Michael A. Carasik MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course will focus on using the grammar and vocabulary learned at the introductory level to enable students to read Biblical texts independently and take advanced Bible exegesis courses. We will also work on getting comfortable with the standard dictionaries, concordances, and grammars used by scholars of the Bible. We will concentrate on prose this semester, closely reading Ruth, Jonah, and other prose selections. We will begin to translate from English into Biblical Hebrew, and there will also be a unit on the punctuation marks used in the Bible. This is a suitable entry point for students who already have strong Hebrew skills. JWST473401, JWST173401, HEBR153401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR453401
HEBR 583-401 Medieval Jewish Culture Talya Fishman W 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Through close reading of primary sources in the original Hebrew, participants in this seminar will explore historical circumstances that engaged and shaped medieval Jews in both Christian and Muslim lands, along with the enduring cultural projects that Jews themselves produced. Topics will include Geonica, Karaism, the encounter of Reason and Revelation; the Christian "Other": the Muslim "Other"; legal codification; the Tosafist project; Rhineland Pietism; Minhag (custom); family life; the aesthetic dimension; Kabbalah; conversos; messianism. Students should be able to comfortably read unpointed Hebrew. RELS523401, JWST523401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
HEBR 651-401 Elem Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in Modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. JWST051401, HEBR051401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR651401
HEBR 651-402 Elem Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in Modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. JWST051402, HEBR051402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR651402
HEBR 652-401 Elem Modern Hebrew II Ibrahim Miari MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
A continuation of HEBR 051, First Year Modern Hebrew, which assumes basic skills of reading and speaking and the use of the present tense. Open to all students who have completed one semester of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST052401, HEBR052401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR652401
HEBR 653-401 Intrm Modern Hebrew III Liora Tamir MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in Modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST053401, HEBR053401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR653401
HEBR 653-402 Intrm Modern Hebrew III Joseph L Benatov MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in Modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST053402, HEBR053402 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR653402
HEBR 654-401 Intrm Modern Hebrew IV Joseph L Benatov MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
This course constitutes the final semester of Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Hence, one of the main goals of the course is to prepare the students for the proficiency exam in Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar skills and ability to read literary texts. Open to all students who have completed three semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST054401, HEBR054401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=HEBR654401
NELC 031-401 Hist Mid East Since 1800 Eve M. Troutt Powell MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST081401 History & Tradition Sector Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC031401
NELC 031-402 History of the Middle East Since 1800 Dahlia El Zein F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST081402 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 031-403 History of the Middle East Since 1800 CANCELED A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST081403 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 031-404 History of the Middle East Since 1800 Dahlia El Zein F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST081404 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 031-405 History of the Middle East Since 1800 CANCELED A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST081405 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 031-406 History of the Middle East Since 1800 Dahlia El Zein R 04:30 PM-05:30 PM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST081406 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 031-407 History of the Middle East Since 1800 CANCELED A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST081407 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 036-401 Mideast Thru Many Lenses Heather Sharkey T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM This freshman seminar introduces the contemporary Middle East by drawing upon cutting-edge studies written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. These include history, political science, and anthropology, as well as studies of mass media, sexuality, religion, urban life, and the environment. We will spend the first few weeks of the semester surveying major trends in modern Middle Eastern history. We will spend subsequent weeks intensively discussing assigned readings along with documentary films that we will watch in class. The semester will leave students with both a foundation in Middle Eastern studies and a sense of current directions in the field. CIMS036401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC036401
NELC 045-301 Ancient Iraq Philip Jones R 01:30 PM-04:30 PM The land and peoples of Iraq have a long and rich history stemming from the birth of writing in its earliest cities. Beginning with the landscapes and environments, we discover the most important elements of Iraq's ancient civilizations. The course includes several visits to the Penn Museum to view the galleries and engage with tablets and other artifacts first hand. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC045301
NELC 052-401 Med & Early Mod Jewry Anne O Albert TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Follow the journey of one global diaspora over a millennium of cultural, intellectual, social, and religious change. From the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the separation of church and state in the seventeenth, Jewish people were intimate parts of, and at the same time utterly othered by, the many societies in which they lived. This basic duality is at the heart of this course, exploring how Jewish religion and culture evolved in relationship with Muslim and Christian majorities. Students will develop an understanding of the rich dynamism of premodern Judaism and Jewish life, with an emphasis on global diversity and internal differentiation as well as change over time. We will look for threads of continuity and moments of transformation, decode illustrative texts, images, and documents (in English), and ask how the Judaism that faced modernity had been shaped by a staggering array of different cultural circumstances after antiquity. The course includes attention to anti-Jewish phenomena like expulsion and blood libel, but also at coexistence and creative cultural synthesis, avoiding any simplistic narrative and asking about their legacy in the present day. It will look at the Jewish past from the inside, including less familiar dimensions including philosophy, magic, messianism, and family life. RELS121401, HIST140401, JWST157401 History & Tradition Sector Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC052401
NELC 101-401 Intro To Anc Near East Emily L Hammer TR 03:00 PM-04:00 PM The great pyramids and mysterious mummies of Egypt, the fabled Tower of Babel, and the laws of the Babylonian king Hammurabi are some of the things that might come to mind when you think of the ancient Near East. Yet these are only a very few of the many fascinating -- and at time perplexing -- aspects of the civilizations that flourished there c. 3300-300 BCE. This is where writing first developed, where people thought that the gods wrote down what would happen in the future on the lungs and livers of sacrificed sheep, and where people knew how to determine the length of hypotenuse a thousand years before the Greek Pythagoras was born. During this course, we will learn more about these other matters and discover their place in the cultures and civilizations of that area. This is an interdisciplinary survey of the history, society and culture of the ancient Near East, in particular Egypt and Mesopotamia, utilizing extensive readings from ancient texts in translation (including the Epic of Gilgamesh, "one of the great masterpieces of world literature"), but also making use of archaeological and art historical materials. The goal of the course is to gain an appreciation of the various societies of the time, to understand some of their great achievements, to become acquainted with some of the fascinating individuals of the time (such as Hatshepsut, "the women pharaoh," and Akhenaten, "the heretic king"), and to appreciate the rich heritage that they have left us. ANCH025401, HIST024401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC101401
NELC 101-402 Introduction To the Ancient Near East Robert James Vigar F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The great pyramids and mysterious mummies of Egypt, the fabled Tower of Babel, and the laws of the Babylonian king Hammurabi are some of the things that might come to mind when you think of the ancient Near East. Yet these are only a very few of the many fascinating -- and at time perplexing -- aspects of the civilizations that flourished there c. 3300-300 BCE. This is where writing first developed, where people thought that the gods wrote down what would happen in the future on the lungs and livers of sacrificed sheep, and where people knew how to determine the length of hypotenuse a thousand years before the Greek Pythagoras was born. During this course, we will learn more about these other matters and discover their place in the cultures and civilizations of that area. This is an interdisciplinary survey of the history, society and culture of the ancient Near East, in particular Egypt and Mesopotamia, utilizing extensive readings from ancient texts in translation (including the Epic of Gilgamesh, "one of the great masterpieces of world literature"), but also making use of archaeological and art historical materials. The goal of the course is to gain an appreciation of the various societies of the time, to understand some of their great achievements, to become acquainted with some of the fascinating individuals of the time (such as Hatshepsut, "the women pharaoh," and Akhenaten, "the heretic king"), and to appreciate the rich heritage that they have left us. ANCH025402, HIST024402 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 101-403 Introduction To the Ancient Near East Marc Marin Webb F 09:00 AM-10:00 AM The great pyramids and mysterious mummies of Egypt, the fabled Tower of Babel, and the laws of the Babylonian king Hammurabi are some of the things that might come to mind when you think of the ancient Near East. Yet these are only a very few of the many fascinating -- and at time perplexing -- aspects of the civilizations that flourished there c. 3300-300 BCE. This is where writing first developed, where people thought that the gods wrote down what would happen in the future on the lungs and livers of sacrificed sheep, and where people knew how to determine the length of hypotenuse a thousand years before the Greek Pythagoras was born. During this course, we will learn more about these other matters and discover their place in the cultures and civilizations of that area. This is an interdisciplinary survey of the history, society and culture of the ancient Near East, in particular Egypt and Mesopotamia, utilizing extensive readings from ancient texts in translation (including the Epic of Gilgamesh, "one of the great masterpieces of world literature"), but also making use of archaeological and art historical materials. The goal of the course is to gain an appreciation of the various societies of the time, to understand some of their great achievements, to become acquainted with some of the fascinating individuals of the time (such as Hatshepsut, "the women pharaoh," and Akhenaten, "the heretic king"), and to appreciate the rich heritage that they have left us. ANCH025403, HIST024403 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 101-404 Introduction To the Ancient Near East F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM The great pyramids and mysterious mummies of Egypt, the fabled Tower of Babel, and the laws of the Babylonian king Hammurabi are some of the things that might come to mind when you think of the ancient Near East. Yet these are only a very few of the many fascinating -- and at time perplexing -- aspects of the civilizations that flourished there c. 3300-300 BCE. This is where writing first developed, where people thought that the gods wrote down what would happen in the future on the lungs and livers of sacrificed sheep, and where people knew how to determine the length of hypotenuse a thousand years before the Greek Pythagoras was born. During this course, we will learn more about these other matters and discover their place in the cultures and civilizations of that area. This is an interdisciplinary survey of the history, society and culture of the ancient Near East, in particular Egypt and Mesopotamia, utilizing extensive readings from ancient texts in translation (including the Epic of Gilgamesh, "one of the great masterpieces of world literature"), but also making use of archaeological and art historical materials. The goal of the course is to gain an appreciation of the various societies of the time, to understand some of their great achievements, to become acquainted with some of the fascinating individuals of the time (such as Hatshepsut, "the women pharaoh," and Akhenaten, "the heretic king"), and to appreciate the rich heritage that they have left us. ANCH025404, HIST024404 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 111-401 Water in the Middle East Throughout History Emily L Hammer TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Water scarcity is one of most important problems facing much of the Middle East and North Africa today. These are arid regions, but human and natural systems have interacted to determine relative water scarcity and abundance at different times and places. This course examines the distribution of water resources throughout the Middle East and the archaeology and anthropology of water exploitation and management over the last 9000 years, looking at continuities and changes through time. Students will learn to make basic digital maps representing Middle Eastern hydro-geography and arguments about modern and historic water resources in the region. The class will cooperatively play an "irrigation management game" designed to familiarize personnel involved in the operation of irrigation schemes with the logistical and social issues involved in water management. We will engage with a variety of media, including academic readings, popular journalism, films, satellite imagery, and digital maps, in our quest to explore whether or not the past can inform present efforts to better manage modern water resources. The course is structured in units focused on each of the major hydro-environmental zones of the Middle East: the river valleys of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Levant, the internal basins of western Central Asia and the Levant, the deserts of Arabia and North Africa, highland zones in Yemen and Iran, and coastal marsh areas along the Persian Gulf. We will examine irrigation systems, water supply systems, and ways of life surrounding water sources known from ethnographic studies, history, and archaeological excavations. These data will allow us to engage with debates in Middle Eastern anthropology, including those concerning the relationship between water and political power, the environment in which the world's earliest cities arose, and the relevance of "lessons of the past" for present and potential future water crises and "water wars." In our final weeks, we will discuss archaeology and historical anthropology's contribution to conceptions of water "sustainability" and examine attempts to revive traditional/ancient technologies and attitudes about water. ANTH110401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Freshman Seminar
Humanities & Social Science Sector
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC111401
NELC 136-401 Introduction To Islam CANCELED This course is an introduction to Islam as a religion as it exists in societies of the past as well as the present. It explores the many ways in which Muslims have interpreted and put into practice the prophetic message of Muhammad through historical and social analyses of varying theological, philosophical, legal, political, mystical and literary writings, as well as through visual art and music. The aim of the course is to develop a framework for explaining the sources and symbols through which specific experiences and understandings have been signified as Islamic, both by Muslims and by other peoples with whom they have come into contact, with particular emphasis given to issues of gender, religious violence and changes in beliefs and behaviors which have special relevance for contemporary society. SAST139401, RELS143401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
NELC 148-401 Warriors,Concubines,And Converts: the Ottoman Empire in the Mid East & Euro Oscar Aguirre Mandujano TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM For almost six hundred years, the Ottomans ruled most of the Balkans and the Middle East. From their bases in Anatolia, Ottoman armies advanced into the Balkans, Syria, Egypt, and Iraq, constantly challenging the borders of neighboring European and Islamicate empires. By the end of the seventeenth century, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Cairo, Baghdad, Sarajevo, Budapest, and nearly Vienna came under Ottoman rule. As the empire expanded into Europe and the Middle East, the balance of imperial power shifted from warriors to converts, concubines, and intellectuals. This course examines the expansion of the Ottoman sultanate from a local principality into a sprawling empire with a sophisticated bureaucracy; it also investigates the social, cultural, and intellectual developments that accompanied the long arc of the empire's rise and fall. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify and discuss major currents of change in the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East. The student will have a better understanding of the roles of power, ideology, diplomacy, and gender in the construction of empire and a refined appreciation for diverse techniques of historical analysis. HIST148401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC148401
NELC 150-401 Intro To the Bible Isabel Cranz TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM An introduction to the major themes and ideas of the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), with attention to the contributions of archaeology and modern Biblical scholarship, including Biblical criticism and the response to it in Judaism and Christianity. All readings are in English. NELC450401, JWST150401, RELS150401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Humanities & Social Science Sector
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC150401
NELC 153-401 How To Read the Bible Steven Phillip Weitzman TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The aim of this course is to explore what the Bible means, and why it means such different things to different people. Why do people find different kinds of meaning in the Bible. Who is right in the struggle over its meaning, and how does one go about deciphering that meaning in the first place? Focusing on the book of Genesis, this seminar seeks to help students answer these questions by introducing some of the many ways in which the Bible has been read over the ages. exploring its meaning as understood by ancient Jews and Christians, modern secular scholars, contemporary fiction writers, feminist activists, philosophers and other kinds of interpreter. JWST131401, RELS130401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC153401
NELC 154-401 Women in Jewish Lit Kathryn Hellerstein TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM "Jewish woman, who knows your life? In darkness you have come, in darkness do you go." J. L. Gordon (1890). This course will bring into the light the long tradition of women as readers, writers, and subjects in Jewish literature. All texts will be in translation from Yiddish and Hebrew, or in English. Through a variety of genres -- devotional literature, memoir, fiction, and poetry -- we will study women's roles and selves, the relations of women and men, and the interaction between Jewish texts and women's lives. The legacy of women in Yiddish devotional literature will serve as background for our reading of modern Jewish fiction and poetry from the past century. The course is divided into five segments. The first presents a case study of the Matriarchs Rachel and Leah, as they are portrayed in the Hebrew Bible, in rabbinic commentary, in pre-modern prayers, and in modern poems. We then examine a modern novel that recasts the story of Dinah, Leah's daughter. Next we turn to the seventeenth century Glikl of Hamel, the first Jewish woman memoirist. The third segment focuses on devotional literature for and by women. In the fourth segment, we read modern women poets in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. The course concludes with a fifth segment on fiction written by women in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. All readings and lectures in English. GRMN262401, JWST268401, GSWS162401 Arts & Letters Sector Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC154401
NELC 159-401 Mod Heb Lit & Film Trans: Fantasy, Dreams, and Madness in Lit & Film Nili R Gold TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course examines cinematic and literary portrayals of childhood. While Israeli works constitute more than half of the course's material, European film and fiction play comparative roles. Many of the works are placed, and therefore discussed, against a backdrop of national or historical conflicts. Nonetheless, private traumas (such as madness, abuse, or loss) or an adult s longing for an idealized time are often the central foci of the stories. These issues and the nature of individual and collective memory will be discussed from a psychological point of view. Additionally, the course analyzes how film, poetry and prose use their respective languages to reconstruct the image of childhood; it discusses the authors and directors struggle to penetrate the psyche of a child and to retrieve fragments of past events. CIMS159401, JWST154401, COML282401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC159401
NELC 160-401 The Making of Scripture Simcha Gross TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The Bible as we know it is the product of a lengthy process of development, elaboration, contest, and debate. Rather than a foregone conclusion, the process by which the texts and traditions within the bible, and the status ascribed to them, was turbulent and uncertain. This course examines that process, examining the Bible, traditions and communities from the Second Temple Period - such as the Dead Sea Scrolls and Community - that rewrote, reconsidered, revised, or rejected now well-recognized figures and stories, and constructed distinct ideas of what was considered scripture and how it should be approached. Even as the bible began to resemble the corpus as we now know it, interpretive strategies rendered it entirely different, such as Hellenistic Allegorizers, working from the platonic tradition, rabbinic readers who had an entirely different set of hermeneutics, early Christians, who offered different strategies for reading the "Old" and "New" Testaments alongside one another (and employing categories like "Old" and "New," themselves constituting a new attitude and relationship to and between these texts), and lastly early Muslim readers, who embraced many of the stories in the Bible, altered others, and debated the status of these corpuses under Islam. JWST160401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC160401
NELC 166-401 Religion Ancient Egypt David P Silverman MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Weekly lectures (some of which will be illustrated) and a field trip to the University Museum's Egyptian Section. The multifaceted approach to the subject matter covers such topics as funerary literature and religion, cults, magic religious art and architecture, and the religion of daily life. NELC468401, RELS114401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC166401
NELC 182-401 Ancient Civs of the Wrld Richard L Zettler TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course explores the archaeology (material culture) of early complex societies or civilizations in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Aegean. According to the traditional paradigm, civilization first emerged during the fourth millennium BCE in Egypt and Mesopotamia. In the Mediterranean, state-level societies first appeared in Crete and mainland Greece in the early second millennium BCE. This course investigates how and why these civilizations developed, as well as their appearance and structure in the early historic (or literate) phases of their existence. A comparative perspective will illustrate what these early civilizations have in common and the ways in which they are unique. This course will consist largely of lectures which will outline classic archaeological and anthropological theories on state formation, before turning to examine the available archaeological (and textual) data on emerging complexity in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Aegean. This course does not presuppose any knowledge of archaeology or ancient languages; the instructor will provide any background necessary. Because this is a course on material culture, some of the class periods will be spent at the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. These will consist of a guided tour of a relevant gallery, as well as a hands-on object-based lab with archaeological materials selected by the instructor. This course meets the General Education Curriculums Cross Cultural Analysis f oundational approach, whose aim is to help students understand and interpret t he cultures of peoples (even long-dead peoples) with histories different from their own; it also fulfills the History and Tradition Sector breadth requirement. ANTH139401, URBS139401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC182401
NELC 183-401 Food and Fire Katherine M Moore MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH148401, CLST148401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC183401
NELC 183-402 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory Katherine M Moore R 01:30 PM-02:30 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH148402, CLST148402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 183-403 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory Katherine M Moore R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH148403, CLST148403 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 183-404 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory Katherine M Moore F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH148404, CLST148404 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 183-405 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory Katherine M Moore F 01:00 PM-02:00 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH148405, CLST148405 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
NELC 189-401 Worlds of Indian Ocean Ian C. Petrie TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Do oceans serve to divide and demarcate district cultures and regions? Or do they facilitate exchange, connection and cosmopolitanism? This course will explore the manner in which the Indian Ocean has played both roles throughout history, and how the nature of those divisions and connections has changed over time from the ancient to the modern world. We will reconstruct the intertwined mercantile, religious and kinship networks that spanned the Indian Ocean world, across the Middle East, East Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia and China, illuminating the histories of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam, while also considering the role of successive imperial political formations, from Rome to Britain. Throughout the semester we will seek to understand the Indian Ocean through the people who lived and worked in its milieu - from consuls and military commanders, to traders, brokers, sailors, prisoners and slaves. Course materials will draw on a variety of disciplines (anthropology, archaeology, and material culture, religious studies) to construct the cultural, economic, and environmental history of the Indian Ocean. By the end of the course, students will also have a good understanding of the historical geography of the Indian Ocean region; the shifting nature of cross-regional interactions over time in that region; and the way this region contributes to continuing change in global political economy ANTH169401, SAST169401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC189401
NELC 217-401 Intro To Persian Fiction: Iran & West Thru Fiction Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This undergraduate level course explores key tropes and themes of Iranian modernity through a close reading of Persian novel, short story, travelogue, and memoir. Various literary genres from social realism, to surrealism, magic realism, naturalism, and absurd literature will be introduced with specific reference to Iran's literature and in light of literary theory of novel. The course does not require any prior knowledge of Persian language and literature. Throughout the course, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between Persian fiction and the West. We will investigate this curious relationship through themes of gender, religion, politics and war. NELC517401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC217401
NELC 218-401 Media and Culture in Contemporary Iran Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the culture and media of modern Iran, with a critical perspective on issues such as identity formation, ethnicity, race, and nation-building. It focuses on how these issues relate to various aspects of modern Iranian culture -- such as religion, gender, sexuality, war, and migration -- through the lens of media, cinema, and literature. NELC518401, CIMS218401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC218401
NELC 224-401 Art of Mesopotamia Holly Pittman TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The class presents a survey of the art and archaeology of Mesopotamia beginning with the appearance of the first cities and ending with the fall of the Assyrian Empire in the seventh century BCE. It presents the major artistic monuments of Mesopotamian culture, embedding them in their historical context. Focus is placed in particular on the interactions with surrounding cultures of Iran, Central Asia, the Caucasus, the Persian Gulf and Anatolia in order to decenter the discourse from a strictly Mesopotamian perspective. The format is lecture; assignments involve reading response papers; there are in class midterm and final exams. ARTH224401, ARTH624401, AAMW624401, NELC624401 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC224401
NELC 235-301 Food in Islamic Mid East Heather Sharkey M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM In the tenth century, a scholar named Ibn Sayyar al-Warraq produced an Arabic manuscript called Kitab al-Tabikh (The Book of Cooking). This volume, which c ompiled and discussed the recipes of eighth- and ninth-century Islamic rulers (caliphs) and their courts in Iraq, represents the oldest known surviving cookbook of the Arab-Islamic world. Many more such cookbooks followed; in their day they represented an important literary genre among cultured elites. As one food historian recently noted, there are more cookbooks in Arabic from before 1400 than in the rest of the worlds languages put together. Ibn Sayyars cookbook can help us to think about the historical and cultural d ynamics of food. In this class, we will focus on the Middle East across the sweep of the Islamic era, into the modern period, and until the present day, although many of the readings will consider the study of food in other places (including the contemporary United States) for comparative insights. The class will use the historical study of food and foodways as a lens for examining subject s that relate to a wide array of fields and interests. These subjects include economics, agricultural and environmental studies, anthropology, literature, religion, and public health. With regard to the modern era, the course will pay close attention to the consequences of food for shaping memories and identities including religious, ethnic, national, and gender-b ased identities particularly among people who have dispersed or otherwise mig rated. It will also focus considerably on the politics of food, that is, on the place of food in power relations.Among the questions we will debate are these: How does food reflect, shape, or inform history? By approaching the study of Middle Eastern cultures through food, what new or different things can we see? What is the field of food studies, and what can it offer to scholars? What is food writing as a literary form, and what methodological and conceptual ch allenges face those who undertake it? Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC235301
NELC 238-401 Intro To Islamic Law Joseph E. Lowry TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course will introduce students to classical Islamic law, the all-embracing sacred law of Islam. Among the world's various legal systems, Islamic law may be the most widely misunderstood and even misrepresented; certainly, misconceptions about it abound. Islamic law is, however, the amazing product of a rich, fascinating and diverse cultural and intellectual tradition. Most of the readings in this course will be taken from primary sources in translation. Areas covered will include criminal law, family law, law in the Quran, gender and sexuality, the modern application of Islamic law, Islamic government and other selected topics. RELS248401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC238401
NELC 250-401 Bible in Translation: Kings Isabel Cranz TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course introduces students to one specific Book of the Hebrew Bible. "The Bible in Translation" involves an in-depth reading of a biblical source against the background of contemporary scholarship. Depending on the book under discussion, this may also involve a contextual reading with other biblical books and the textual sources of the ancient Near East. Although no prerequisites are required, this class is a perfect follow-up course to "Intro to the Bible." NELC550401, JWST255401, RELS224401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC250401
NELC 258-401 Jewish Folklore Dan Ben-Amos TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The Jews are among the few nations and ethnic groups whose oral tradition occurs in literary and religious texts dating back more than two thousand years. This tradition changed and diversified over the years in terms of the migrations of Jews into different countries and the historical, social, and cultural changes that these countries underwent. The course attempts to capture the historical and ethnic diversity of Jewish Folklore in a variety of oral literary forms. JWST260401, FOLK280401, COML283401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC258401
NELC 259-401 Intro Modern Hebrew Lit: the First Israelis: Amichai, Oz Et. Al Nili R Gold T 04:30 PM-06:30 PM The objective of this course is to develop an artistic appreciation for literature through in-depth class discussions and text analysis. Readings are comprised of Israeli poetry and short stories. Students examine how literary language expresses psychological and cultural realms. The course covers topics such as: the short story reinvented, literature and identity, and others. Because the content of this course changes from year to year, students may take it for credit more than once. This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.Grading is based primarily on participation and students' literary understanding. NELC559401, JWST259401, COML266401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC259401
NELC 261-401 Ancient Iranian Empires Simcha Gross T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Iran - as a landmass and a political entity - was central to the ancient world in a variety of ways. Ancient Iranian Empires were of central importance to - and centrally located in - the ancient world. It was the successor kingdom to the Assyrians and Babylonians; the power against which Greece and Rome defined themselves; and the crucible in which various communities and models of rule developed. This course offers a survey of the history of the ancient Persianate world, focusing in particular on the political and imperial entities that rose to power, the cultural, political, mercantile, and other contacts they shared with their neighbors to the East and West, and the communities and religious groups that arose and flourished within their lands. Ancient Iranian empires rivaled the Greek and Roman Empires to their West, and the central and eastern Asian Empires to their east, and the ongoing history of diplomacy, cultural contact, and war between these regions was formative to each and to the ancient world as a whole. Iran was home to and similarly formative for a variety of religions, including Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Manichaeism, and Islam, and a central question Ancient Iranian political powers sought to address was how to negotiate and address the variety of populations under their control. The course will conclude by studying how, rather than a simplistic story of decline, the strategies, policies, institutions, and memory of the Iranian Empires continued to shape early Islam, medieval imagination, and modern political regimes. NELC561401, RELS261401, ANCH261401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC261401
NELC 266-401 Hist of Anc Egypt Josef W Wegner TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Review and discussion of the principal aspects of ancient Egyptian history, 3000-500 BC. NELC666401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC266401
NELC 284-401 The Material World in Archaeological Science Marie-Claude Boileau
Jan Moritz Jansen
Deborah I Olszewski
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM In this course, we will study the history of the Hellenistic and Roman period a from a Near Eastern perspective. From the conquests of Alexander the Great to the end of Roman rule in late antiquity, this region was the scene of conflicts, but also of peaceful and fruitful interactions between Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Jews, Syrians, Arabs and many other societies. What was the impact of Greek and Roman rule and how did the inhabitants of the region react to these fundamental changes? On the other hand, how did they influence the culture and worldview of their conquerors? We will use historical texts, documents and archaeological evidence to discuss the political, cultural and religious encounters that made the Near East a key region of Greco-Roman history. All texts will be discussed in translation. No prerequisites, although it would be useful to have taken ANCH 026 and/or ANCH 027. ANTH521401, ANTH221401, ARTH230401, NELC584401, CLST244401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
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NELC 338-401 Age of Sultans 1100-1500 Paul M. Cobb T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM In this course, we will examine the social and political history of the Islamic Near East in its medieval centuries, from the coming of the Saljuq Turks to the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires. Special topics include: the Eleventh-Century Transformation; Crusades and Jihads, the Mamluk Institution; Knowledge and Power; The Mongol Invasions; Timur and His Legacy; Gunpowder Empires. This course requires basic prior knowledge of Islam and the Near East, such as prior enrollment in NELC 102 or equivalent. Note that undergraduates must register for the course as NELC 338; graduate students must register for the course as NELC 638. Undergraduates are not permitted to register under the graduate number. Prerequisite: This course requires basic prior knowledge of Islam and the Near East, such as prior enrollment in NELC 102 or equivalent. Note that undergraduates must register for the course as NELC 338; graduates are not permitted to register under the graduate number. NELC738401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC338401
NELC 362-401 Int Digital Archaeology Jason Herrmann MW 03:30 PM-05:30 PM Digital methodologies are now an integral part of archaeological practice and archaeologists are now expected to possess basic computing skills and be familiar with a range of data collection, analysis and visualization techniques. This course will use case studies and applied learning opportunities centered on a course project to explore a broad array of digital approaches in archaeology. The technological underpinnings, professional procedures, and influences on archaeological practice and theory will be discussed for each method covered in the course. Applied learning opportunities in digital data collection methods will include aerial and satellite image analysis, global navigation satellite system (GNSS) survey, 3D scanning methods, close-range photogrammetry, and near-surface geophysical prospection. Students will also have opportunities for practical experience in digital database design and management, geographic information science (GIS) and 3D visualization. Students will communicate the results of the course project in a digital story that will be presented at the end of the term. Prior archaeological classwork and/or experience preferred. ANTH362401, ANTH562401, AAMW562401, CLST362401, CLST562401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC362401
NELC 401-401 Beginning Hindi-Urdu - Part I Josh Pien MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This is a systematic introduction to Urdu language and culture for beginners. The course aims at developing listening and comprehension and a real life interactive speaking ability in a variety of everyday topics. The Urdu script is introduced from the beginning. The target language is presented in its total socio cultural context for achieving a meaningful and operational control of languages. Students acquire basic rules for structural and socio - cultural appropriateness. Students are expected to learn a vocabulary of about 1200 words during the semester. The final evaluation will be based on class participation, performance in quizzes and tests and completed assignments. URDU401401, HIND400401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC401401
NELC 431-401 Advanced Urdu Mustafa A Menai TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course is designed to give in-depth exposure to some of the finest works of classical and modern Urdu prose and poetry along with the historical and socio-political trends they represent. Figures covered range from Ghalib (b.1797) to Faiz, Fehmida Riaz, and post 9/11 Urdu prose and poetry. The course is open to both undergraduates and graduate students, subject to having intermediate level proficiency. The course is repeatable, and hte content changes every semester. Multi-media content such as music, videos, blogs etc. will be actively incorporated. Every effort will be made to accommidate individual interests. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor with any questions, or if they are unsure about eligibility. URDU431401 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC431401
NELC 450-401 Intro To the Bible Isabel Cranz TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM An introduction to the major themes and ideas of the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), with attention to the contributions of archaeology and modern Biblical scholarship, including Biblical criticism and the response to it in Judaism and Christianity. All readings are in English. JWST150401, NELC150401, RELS150401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Humanities & Social Science Sector
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC450401
NELC 454-401 Spirit and Law Talya Fishman M 03:00 PM-06:00 PM While accepting "the yoke of the commandments", Jewish thinkers from antiquity onward have perennially sought to make the teachings of revelation more meaningful in their own lives. Additional impetus for this quest has come from overtly polemical challenges to the law, such as those leveled by Paul, medieval Aristotelians, Spinoza and Kant. This course explores both the critiques of Jewish Law, and Jewish reflections on the Law's meaning and purpose, by examining a range of primary sources within their intellectual and historical contexts. Texts (in English translation) include selections from Midrash, Talmud, medieval Jewish philosophy and biblical exegesis, kabbalah, Hasidic homilies, Jewish responses to the Enlightenment, and contemporary attempts to re-value and invent Jewish rituals. RELS520401, JWST320401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC454401
NELC 459-401 Prose Narrative Dan Ben-Amos T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM Historical, literary, comparative, and ethnographic methods contribute to study of prose narratives which were told in oral societies in antiquity and in modern times and were documented in literary societies for different purposes. Oral storytellers, both professional and amateurs, performed them in private and public spaces. Their recording from antiquity to modern times became an integral element of modern life in general and in education and arts in particular. The storytellers, their performances in oral and literary cultures, their genres, and their symbolic meanings are the subjects of the course, together with the analytical methods that help mapping their distribution worldwide. FOLK459401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
NELC 468-401 Religion Ancient Egypt David P Silverman MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Weekly lectures (some of which will be illustrated) and a field trip to the University Museum's Egyptian Section. The multifaceted approach to the subject matter covers such topics as funerary literature and religion, cults, magic religious art and architecture, and the religion of daily life. NELC166401, RELS114401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC468401
NELC 517-401 Literature of Mod Iran: Iran & West Thru Fiction Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This graduate level course explores key tropes and themes of Iranian modernity through a close reading of Persian novels, short stories, travelogues, and memoirs. Various literary genres from social realism, to surrealism, magic realism, naturalism, and absurd literature will be introduced with specific reference to Iran's literature and in light of literary theory of novel. This course does not require any prior knowledge of Persian language and literature. Throughout the course, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between Persian fiction and the West. We will investigate this curious relationship through themes of gender, religion, politics, and war. NELC217401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC517401
NELC 518-401 Media and Culture in Contemporary Iran Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the culture and media of modern Iran, with a critical perspective on issues such as identity formation, ethnicity, race, and nation-building. It focuses on how these issues relate to various aspects of modern Iranian culture - such as religion, gender, sexuality, war, and migration - through the lens of media, cinema, and literature. NELC218401, CIMS218401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC518401
NELC 523-401 Narrative in Ancient Art Holly Pittman
Ann L Kuttner
T 04:30 PM-07:30 PM Art history, and its cousins in religious, social, political and literary studies, have long been fascinated with the question of narrative: how do images engage time, tell stories? These are fundamental questions for ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian and Mediterranean art history and archaeology, whose rich corpus of narrative images is rarely considered in the context of "Western" art. Relations between words and things, texts and images, were as fundamental to the ancient cultures we examine as they are to modern studies. As we weigh classic modern descriptions of narrative and narratology, we will bring to bear recent debates about how (ancient) images, things, monuments, and designed spaces engage with time, space, and event, and interact with cultural memory. We will ask "who is the story for, and why?" for public and private narratives ranging from political histories to mythological encounters. Our case studies will be drawn from the instructors' expertise in Mesopotamian visual culture, and in the visual cultures of the larger Mediterranean world from early Greek antiquity to the Hellenistic, Roman, and Late Antique periods. One central and comparative question, for instance, is the nature of recording history in pictures and texts in the imperial projects of Assyria, Achaemenid Persia, the Hellenistic kingdoms, and Rome. ARTH523401, AAMW523401, CLST523401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC523401
NELC 550-401 Bible in Translation: Kings Isabel Cranz TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course introduces undergraduates and graduate students to one specific Book of the Hebrew Bible. "The Bible in Translation" involves an in-depth reading of a biblical source against the background of contemporary scholarship. Depending on the book under discussion, this may also involve a contextual reading with other biblical books and the textual sources of the ancient Near East. Although no prerequisites are required, NELC 250 is a perfect follow-up course for NELC 150 "Intro to the Bible." NELC250401, JWST255401, RELS224401 Cross Cultural Analysis Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC550401
NELC 559-401 Intro Modern Hebrew Lit: the First Israelis: Amichai, Oz Et. Al Nili R Gold T 04:30 PM-06:30 PM The objective of this course is to develop an artistic appreciation for literature through in-depth class discussions and text analysis. Readings are comprised of Israeli poetry and short stories. Students examine how literary language expresses psychological and cultural realms. The course covers topics such as: the short story reinvented, literature and identity, and others. Because the content of this course changes from year to year, students may take it for credit more than once. This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.Grading is based primarily on participation and students' literary understanding. NELC259401, JWST259401, COML266401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC559401
NELC 561-401 Ancient Iranian Empires Simcha Gross T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM Iran - as a landmass and a political entity - was central to the ancient world in a variety of ways. Ancient Iranian Empires were of central importance to - and centrally located in - the ancient world. It was the successor kingdom to the Assyrians and Babylonians; the power against which Greece and Rome defined themselves; and the crucible in which various communities and models of rule developed. This course offers a survey of the history of the ancient Persianate world, focusing in particular on the political and imperial entities that rose to power, the cultural, political, mercantile, and other contacts they shared with their neighbors to the East and West, and the communities and religious groups that arose and flourished within their lands. Ancient Iranian empires rivaled the Greek and Roman Empires to their West, and the central and eastern Asian Empires to their east, and the ongoing history of diplomacy, cultural contact, and war between these regions was formative to each and to the ancient world as a whole. Iran was home to and similarly formative for a variety of religions, including Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Manichaeism, and Islam, and a central question Ancient Iranian political powers sought to address was how to negotiate and address the variety of populations under their control. The course will conclude by studying how, rather than a simplistic story of decline, the strategies, policies, institutions, and memory of the Iranian Empires continued to shape early Islam, medieval imagination, and modern political regimes. NELC261401, RELS261401, ANCH261401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC561401
NELC 567-301 Sem Egypt Archaeol& Hist Josef W Wegner R 04:30 PM-07:30 PM Specific topics will vary from year to year. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC567301
NELC 584-401 The Material World in Archaeological Science Marie-Claude Boileau
Jan Moritz Jansen
Deborah I Olszewski
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM ANTH521401, ANTH221401, ARTH230401, NELC284401, CLST244401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC584401
NELC 624-401 Art of Mesopotamia Holly Pittman TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM The class presents a survey of the art and archaeology of Mesopotamia beginning with the appearance of the first cities and ending with the fall of the Assyrian Empire in the seventh century BCE. It presents the major artistic monuments of Mesopotamian culture, embedding them in their historical context. Focus is placed in particular on the interactions with surrounding cultures of Iran, Central Asia, the Caucasus, the Persian Gulf and Anatolia in order to decenter the discourse from a strictly Mesopotamian perspective. The format is lecture; assignments involve reading response papers; there are in class midterm and final exams. ARTH224401, ARTH624401, AAMW624401, NELC224401 Cross Cultural Analysis Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC624401
NELC 633-301 Sel Topics Arabic Lit Huda Fakhreddine W 11:00 AM-02:00 PM This is the graduate seminar course in which a variety of aspects of Arabic literature studies are covered at the advanced graduate level. Students in this course are expected to be able to read large amounts of literature in Arabic on a weekly basis and to be able to discuss them critically during the class itself. Topics are chosen to reflect student interest. Recent topics have included: 1001 NIGHTS; the short story; the novel; MAQAMAT; classical ADAB prose; the drama; the novella; modern Arabic poetry. Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC633301
NELC 666-401 Hist of Anc Egypt Josef W Wegner TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Review and discussion of the principal aspects of ancient Egyptian history, 3000-500 BC. NELC266401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC666401
NELC 738-401 Age of Sultans 1100-1500 Paul M. Cobb T 01:30 PM-04:30 PM After the "golden age" of the Islamic Near East in the early Middle Ages, the empires controlled by the caliphs began to fragment and political power devolved to a constellation of local dynasties, princelings, and entirely new ethnic and religious groups. This course traces the changes wrought by this fragmentation in the Islamic Near East's political, social, and cultural history. It is a period rivaled in its creativity only by the early Islamic era that preceded it. It was in this period that saw the arrival of Turkish groups in large numbers, and saw the cosmopolitan Islam of earlier centuries challenged by the arrival of European Crusaders, pagan Mongol hordes, and movements of reform from within. In many ways, much of what we think of today as "Islam" or "Islamic" are products of this period. Special topics include: the Eleventh-Century Transformation; Crusades and Jihads, the Mamluk Institution; Knowledge and Power; The Mongol Invasions; Timur and His Legacy; Gunpowder Empires. NELC338401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=NELC738401
PERS 011-401 Elem Persian I Mahyar Entezari TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
This course is designed to help you start learning Persian and to give you the necessary tools to continue your study of Persian. This course introduces the Persian alphabet alongside grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. The four language skills (i.e., listening, speaking, reading and writing) as well as pronunciation and culture are integrated into the curriculum. There is no prerequisite. PERS611401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
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PERS 013-401 Intermed Persian I Mahyar Entezari TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course is conducted in Persian and designed to help you continue expanding upon what you have learned in Elementary Persian II (PERS-012). In this course, we will begin to address a broader variety of cultural topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore use of English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students must either have successfully completed PERS 012 or take the departmental placement exam. PERS613401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=PERS013401
PERS 015-680 Advanced Persian I Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM PERS615680 Prior Language Experience Required
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
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PERS 017-680 Persian Heritage Spkrs I: Reading and Writing Mahyar Entezari CANCELED This course is designed to help you strengthen your skills by learning not only to read and write, but also to engage in more complex forms of discourse in Persian. In this course, we will begin to address a variety of topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore, English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students must be proficient in spoken Persian (whether Farsi or Dari), and lack reading and writing skills. PERS617680 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
PERS 611-401 Elem Persian I Mahyar Entezari TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
This course is designed to help you start learning Persian and to give you the necessary tools to continue your study of Persian. This course introduces the Persian alphabet alongside grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. The four language skills (i.e., listening, speaking, reading and writing) as well as pronunciation and culture are integrated into the curriculum. There is no prerequisite. PERS011401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=PERS611401
PERS 613-401 Intermed Persian I Mahyar Entezari TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course is conducted in Persian and designed to help you continue expanding upon what you have learned in Elementary Persian II (PERS-012). In this course, we will begin to address a broader variety of cultural topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore use of English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students must either have successfully completed PERS 612 or take the departmental placement exam. PERS013401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=PERS613401
PERS 615-680 Advanced Persian I Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM PERS015680 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=PERS615680
PERS 617-680 Persian Heritage Spkrs I: Reading and Writing Mahyar Entezari CANCELED This course is conducted in Persian and designed to help you strengthen your skills by learning not only to read and write, but also to engage in more complex forms of discourse in Persian. In this course, we will begin to address a variety of topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore, English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students must be proficient in spoken Persian (whether Farsi or Dari), and lack reading and writing skills. PERS017680 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
TURK 021-401 Elementary Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This is a course for beginners who have no previous knowledge of Turkish. Using a communicative approach, Elementary Turkish introduces basic vocabulary and grammar rules and focuses on building language competencies in listening, reading, speaking and writing. By the end of the course, students will be able to participate in simple conversations, to know daily expressions, and will understand simple dialogues in day-to-day context and will be able to count and tell time. Will be able to speak about events that happened in the past and express plans for the future. Students will also develop writing strategies that will allow them to write simple letters and fill in commonly-used forms. TURK621401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
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TURK 023-401 Intermed Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM A continuation of elementary Turkish, with emphasis on grammar and reading. This course is for students who have previous knowledge of Turkish or students who have completed Elementary Turkish I and II. This course is designed to improve students' writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in Turkish. Students' Turkish language proficiency and cultural awareness and knowledge will increase by exposing to autentic materials and coursework. and in order give them cultural knowledge, students are exposed to authentic materials. TURK623401 Prior Language Experience Required
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TURK 031-680 Elementary Uzbek I Designed to cover beginning college levels of language instruction, Uzbek: An Elementary Textbook provides learners and instructors with a wide selection of materials and task-oriented activities to facilitate the development of language learning. It offers a thematically organized and integrative approach to the Uzbek language and its culture, including a functional approach to grammar, an emphasis on integrated skills development, and the use of authentic materials such as videos filmed in various regions of Uzbekistan.Uzbek: An Elementary Textbook contains one CD-ROM that includes authentic audio and video materials to accompany the text and integrated, interactive exercises and games, all in Flash format and all of which are keyed to the textbook. It includes a supplementary Cyrillic reader, an extensive glossary, and four-color illustrations and photographs throughout. TURK631680 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
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TURK 121-680 Adv Turkish Cult&Media I Feride Servet Hatiboglu T 04:30 PM-07:00 PM This course is for students who are from all different levels of Turkish knowledge. They are expected to write and talk about Turkish movies, culture, politics according to their own level and pace. They will talk to Turkish visitors and interview them. Turkish movies will be the part of the course and once a month, students will watch a Turkish movie and analyze it. Discussions will take place and students will write essays about the movie. This course is designed with a technology-rich, project based approach. The materials will go beyond instruction in grammar and vocabulary to support the acquisition of socio-cultural pragmatics, and intercultural learning. TURK521680 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=TURK121680
TURK 521-680 Adv Turkish Cult&Media I Feride Servet Hatiboglu T 04:30 PM-07:00 PM This course is TURK 121 for graduate students. TURK121680 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=TURK521680
TURK 621-401 Elementary Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is TURK-021 for graduate students. Introduction to the spoken and written language of contemporary Turkey. TURK021401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
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TURK 623-401 Intermed Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course is TURK 023 for graduate students. TURK023401 Crse Online: Sync & Async Components https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020C&course=TURK623401
TURK 631-680 Elementary Uzbek I Designed to cover beginning college levels of language instruction, Uzbek: An Elementary Textbook provides learners and instructors with a wide selection of materials and task-oriented activities to facilitate the development of language learning. It offers a thematically organized and integrative approach to the Uzbek language and its culture, including a functional approach to grammar, an emphasis on integrated skills development, and the use of authentic materials such as videos filmed in various regions of Uzbekistan.Uzbek: An Elementary Textbook contains one CD-ROM that includes authentic audio and video materials to accompany the text and integrated, interactive exercises and games, all in Flash format and all of which are keyed to the textbook. It includes a supplementary Cyrillic reader, an extensive glossary, and four-color illustrations and photographs throughout. TURK031680 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components