Courses for Spring 2022

Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ANEL 441-401 1st Year Akkadian II Joshua A. Jeffers W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Introduction to the grammar of the Akkadian language with emphasis on developing skills in the cuneiform writing system and reading of selected texts. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, instructor permission required. ANEL641401
ANEL 540-001 Akkadian Literary Texts Joshua A. Jeffers M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Readings in Akkadian literary texts from ancient Mesopotamia.
ANEL 546-001 Intermediate Sumerian Stephen J. Tinney Reading literary texts in the Sumerian Language from ancient Mesopotamia.
ANEL 641-401 1st Year Akkadian II Joshua A. Jeffers W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM A continuation of 1st Year Akkadian I, this class builds on the lessons of that class on the grammar of the Akkadian language with emphasis on developing skills in the cuneiform writing system and reading of selected texts. To take this class without first having taken 1st Year Akkadian I requires permission of the instructor. ANEL441401
ARAB 032-401 Elementary Arabic II MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
This course is a continuation of first semester Elementary Arabic, and builds on the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale. ARAB632401
ARAB 032-402 Elementary Arabic II MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
This course is a continuation of first semester Elementary Arabic, and builds on the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale. ARAB632402
ARAB 032-403 Elementary Arabic II MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This course is a continuation of first semester Elementary Arabic, and builds on the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale. ARAB632403
ARAB 034-401 Intermediate Arabic Iv MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
This is the continuation of the first semester Intermediate Arabic. This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students will achieve Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. ARAB634401
ARAB 034-402 Intermediate Arabic Iv MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This is the continuation of the first semester Intermediate Arabic. This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students will achieve Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. ARAB634402
ARAB 036-401 Adv Intermed Arabic II MTWR 08:30 AM-09:30 AM This course is a continuation of first semester Advanced Intermediate Arabic. Emphasis continues to be on all four language skills: Speaking, Listening, Reading, & Writing. The readings for the class are chosen from actual texts from both medieval and modern Arabic in a variety of fields and subjects. Students will be expected to give classroom presentations and to write short essays in Arabic. Evaluation will be both Achievement- and proficiency- based. ARAB636401
ARAB 333-301 Rdgs in Qur'An & Tafsir Joseph E. Lowry TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course has two goals: to introduce undergraduate students to reading the Qur'an in Arabic, and to enhance the speaking, listening, and writing skills in MSA. Through the reading and study of selected major Qur'anic narratives and commentary (tafsir), students will become familiar with Qur'anic vocabulary, style, recitation practices, and other intricacies of the Qur'anic text. All students will also memorize a short sura of their choice and practice reciting it in an aesthetically appropriate manner (typically suras 1, 112, 113, or 114). Taught in MSA with writing assignments in MSA.
ARAB 632-401 Elementary Arabic II MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
This course is a continuation of ARAB 031/631. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB032401
ARAB 632-402 Elementary Arabic II MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
This course is a continuation of ARAB 031/631. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB032402
ARAB 632-403 Elementary Arabic II MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This course is a continuation of ARAB 031/631. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB032403
ARAB 634-401 Intermediate Arabic Iv MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM
This course is a continuation of ARAB 033/633. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB034401
ARAB 634-402 Intermediate Arabic Iv MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
This course is a continuation of ARAB 033/633. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB034402
ARAB 636-401 Adv Intermed Arabic II MTWR 08:30 AM-09:30 AM This course is a continuation of ARAB 035/635. For the second semester: completion of the first semester or permission of the instructor. ARAB036401
ARAB 731-301 Topics Islamic Studies Joseph E. Lowry M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topics vary from year to year in accordance with the interests and needs of students. Although this course typically focuses on premodern Arabic texts, the readings reinforce MSA reading skills.
HEBR 051-401 Elem Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. A grade of B- or higher is needed to continue in the language. JWST051401, HEBR651401
HEBR 052-401 Elem Modern Hebrew II Ibrahim Miari MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A continuation of first semester Elementary Modern Hebrew, which assumes basic skills of reading and speaking and the use of the present tense. Open to all students who have completed one semester of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST052401, HEBR652401
HEBR 053-401 Intrm Modern Hebrew III Ibrahim Miari MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST053401, HEBR653401
HEBR 054-401 Intrm Modern Hebrew IV Joseph L Benatov MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course constitutes the final semester of Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Hence, one of the main goals of the course is to prepare the students for the proficiency exam in Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar skills and ability to read literary texts. Open to all students who have completed three semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST054401, HEBR654401
HEBR 054-402 Intrm Modern Hebrew IV Joseph L Benatov MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course constitutes the final semester of Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Hence, one of the main goals of the course is to prepare the students for the proficiency exam in Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar skills and ability to read literary texts. Open to all students who have completed three semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST054402, HEBR654402
HEBR 059-401 Modern Israeli Culture Joseph L Benatov TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM In this course students are introduced to the vibrant world of contemporary Israeli culture by reading some of the best plays, poems, short stories and journalism published in Israel today. They also watch and analyze some of Israel's most popular films, TV programs, and videos. Themes include Jewish-Arab relations, the founding of the State, family ties and inter generational conflict, war and society, and the recent dynamic changes in Israel society. Students must have taken four semesters of Hebrew at Penn or permission of instructor. Since the content of this course may change from year to year, students may take it more than once (but only once for credit). JWST059401, HEBR552401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=HEBR059401
HEBR 152-401 Elem Biblical Hebrew II Michael A. Carasik MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM A continued introduction to the grammar of Biblical Hebrew, focusing on the verbal system, with an emphasis on developing language skills in handling Biblical texts. A suitable entry point for students who have had some Modern Hebrew. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permission of instructor required. JWST172401, JWST472401, HEBR452401
HEBR 154-401 Intermed Bibl Hebrew II Michael A. Carasik MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is a continuation of the fall semester's Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I. No one will be admitted into the course who has not taken the fall semester. It will continue to focus on using the grammar and vocabulary learned at the introductory level to enable students to read biblical texts independently and take advanced Bible exegesis courses. We will concentrate this semester on various selections of Biblical poetry, including Exodus 15 and Job 28. We will also continue to translate English prose into Biblical Hebrew. JWST174401, JWST474401, HEBR454401
HEBR 452-401 Elem Biblical Hebrew II Michael A. Carasik MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM A continued introduction to the grammar of Biblical Hebrew, focusing on the verbal system, with an emphasis on developing language skills in handling Biblical texts. A suitable entry point for students who have had some Modern Hebrew. Prerequisite: If course requirement not met, permission of instructor required. HEBR152401, JWST172401, JWST472401
HEBR 454-401 Intermed Bibl Hebrew II Michael A. Carasik MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is a continuation of the fall semester's Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I. No one will be admitted into the course who has not taken the fall semester. It will continue to focus on using the grammar and vocabulary learned at the introductory level to enable students to read biblical texts independently and take advanced Bible exegesis courses. We will concentrate this semester on various selections of Biblical poetry, including Exodus 15 and Job 28. We will also continue to translate English prose into Biblical Hebrew. HEBR154401, JWST174401, JWST474401
HEBR 552-401 Modern Israeli Culture Joseph L Benatov TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM After four semesters of language study, it's time to enter the vibrant world of contemporary Israeli culture. In this course students read some of the best plays, poems, short stories, and journalism published in Israel today. They also watch and analyze some of Israel's most popular films, TV programs, and videos. Themes include Jewish-Arab relations, the founding of the State, family ties and intergenerational conflict, war and society, and the recent dynamic changes in Israel society. HEBR 054 or permission of instructor. Since the content of this course may change from year to year, students may take it more than once (but only once for credit). JWST059401, HEBR059401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=HEBR552401
HEBR 651-401 Elem Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in Modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. JWST051401, HEBR051401
HEBR 652-401 Elem Modern Hebrew II Ibrahim Miari MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A continuation of HEBR 051, First Year Modern Hebrew, which assumes basic skills of reading and speaking and the use of the present tense. Open to all students who have completed one semester of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST052401, HEBR052401
HEBR 653-401 Intrm Modern Hebrew III Ibrahim Miari MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in Modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST053401, HEBR053401
HEBR 654-401 Intrm Modern Hebrew IV Joseph L Benatov MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course constitutes the final semester of Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Hence, one of the main goals of the course is to prepare the students for the proficiency exam in Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar skills and ability to read literary texts. Open to all students who have completed three semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST054401, HEBR054401
HEBR 654-402 Intrm Modern Hebrew IV Joseph L Benatov MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course constitutes the final semester of Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Hence, one of the main goals of the course is to prepare the students for the proficiency exam in Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar skills and ability to read literary texts. Open to all students who have completed three semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. JWST054402, HEBR054402
NELC 051-401 Jews & Judaism in Antqty Simcha Gross TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM A broad introduction to the history of Jewish civilization from its Biblical beginnings to the Middle Ages, with the main focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationship between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. JWST156401, HIST139401, NELC451401, RELS120401 History & Tradition Sector
NELC 062-401 Land of the Pharaohs Josef W Wegner TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course provides an introduction to the society, culture and history of ancient Egypt. The objective of the course is to provide an understanding of the characteristics of the civilization of ancient Egypt and how that ancient society succeeded as one of the most successful and long-lived civilizations in world history. AFRC062401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
Objects-Based Learning Course
NELC 068-401 Art & Architr Anc Egypt David P Silverman M 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
W 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
This course will be an introduction to the art, architecture and minor arts that were produced during the three thousand years of ancient Egyptian history. This material will be presented in its cultural and historical contexts through illustrated lectures and will include visits to the collection of the University Museum. NELC668401, ARTH218401, ARTH618401, AAMW618401, ANCH068401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC068401
NELC 102-401 Intro To Middle East Matthew A Sharp TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM This is the second half of the Near East sequence. This course surveys Islamic civilization from circa 600 (the rise of Islam) to the start of the modern era and concentrates on political, social, and cultural trends. Although the emphasis will be on Middle Eastern societies, we will occasionally consider developments in other parts of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa, Central Asia, and Spain, where Islamic civilization was or has been influential. Our goal is to understand the shared features that have distinguished Islamic civilization as well as the varieties of experience that have endowed it with so much diversity. HIST023401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 103-401 Origin & Cultr of Cities Richard L Zettler TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The UN estimates that 2.9 of the world's 6.1 billion people live in cities and that this percentage is rapidly increasing in many parts of the world. This course examines urban life and urban problems by providing anthropological perspectives on this distinctive form of human association and land use. First we will examine the "origin" of cities, focusing on several of the places where cities first developed, including Mesopotamia and the Valley of Mexico. We will then investigate the internal structure of non-industrial cities by looking at case studies from around the world and from connections between the cities of the past and the city in which we live and work today. URBS121401, ANTH121401 History & Tradition Sector
NELC 118-401 Iran Cinema:Gend/Pol/Rel Mahyar Entezari TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This seminar explores Iranian culture, society, history and politics through the medium of film. We will examine a variety of cinematic works that represent the social, political, economic and cultural circumstances of contemporary Iran, as well as the diaspora. Along the way, we will discuss issues pertaining to gender, religion, nationalism, ethnicity, and the role of cinema in Iranian society and beyond. Discussions topics will also include the place of the Iranian diaspora in cinema, as well as the transnational production, distribution, and consumption of Iranian cinema. Films will include those by internationally acclaimed filmmakers, such as Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Asghar Farhadi, Bahman Ghobadi, Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Dariush Mehrjui, Tahmineh Milani, Jafar Panahi, Marjane Satrapi and others. All films will be subtitled in English. No prior knowledge is required. CIMS118401, GSWS118401, NELC618401 Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 136-401 Introduction To Islam Seyed Alireza Noori MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is an introduction to Islam as a religion as it exists in societies of the past as well as the present. It explores the many ways in which Muslims have interpreted and put into practice the prophetic message of Muhammad through historical and social analyses of varying theological, philosophical, legal, political, mystical and literary writings, as well as through visual art and music. The aim of the course is to develop a framework for explaining the sources and symbols through which specific experiences and understandings have been signified as Islamic, both by Muslims and by other peoples with whom they have come into contact, with particular emphasis given to issues of gender, religious violence and changes in beliefs and behaviors which have special relevance for contemporary society. SAST139401, RELS143401
NELC 142-401 British Emp & Partitions Eve M. Troutt Powell
Ramya Sreenivasan
MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The partitions of South Asia and Palestine marked the end of the British Empire in those regions. British colonial rule in India ended in 1947 with the emergence of not one, but two nation states, India and Pakistan. Decolonization was marked by mass migration and ethnic cleansing along their borders. An estimated million people died in the violence in less than a year, and 12.5 million people migrated from their homes. The British Empire also gave up its claims to Palestine in 1947, exhausted by the two nationalisms of Zionists and Palestinians. This partition set up the declaration of the state of Israel, and the War for Palestine. By 1949, almost a million Palestinians found themselves displaced over many borders, some also within the borders of Israel. This comparative course is organized around three themes - the prehistories of these cataclysmic events, the role of Empire in catalyzing them, and the afterlives of these events that continue to haunt us into the present, seventy-five years later. It explores the political history - and the collapse of politics - that led to violence on a scale that was without precedent in the history of the Indian subcontinent. It examines the political, social and cultural events that led to decades of war and exile, and shaped the lives of generations of Palestinians, Israelis and the wider Middle East. Primary sources will help to explore the perspectives of ordinary people whose lives were turned upside down in both places. SAST117401, HIST142401
NELC 158-401 Medieval Jewish Writings Talya Fishman MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Through close readings of primary sources, students will explore products of Jewish culture written in both Christian and Muslim lands between the 10th and 16th centuries, within their historical and cross-cultural contexts. Works will include selections from poetry, philosophy, Bible exegesis, polemic, ethical wills, historiography, pietism, mysticism and legal writings. Students with appropriate language skills will read Hebrew sources in the original. Graduate students will have additional assignments and meetings. NELC458401, JWST153401, COML257401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC158401
NELC 159-401 Mod Heb Lit & Film Trans: Voices of Israel Nili R Gold W 10:15 AM-01:15 PM Like James Joyce's Dublin, Carl Sandburg's Chicago, or even Woody Allen's Paris, cities have long been the object of yearning and the subject of art. In the time of a pandemic, the idea of the city is associated with new challenges and emotions. This course examines how cities are forged in cinema, literature and scholarship as well as the role of their architecture. While we focus on Israeli cities like Jerusalem, Tiberias, or Tel Aviv, we'll compare their artistic portrayals to those of American, German, and Iraqi cities, among others. The psychological and physical bond between writers or directors and their respective places is metabolized in their poetry, prose, and films, and so artistic representations of cities often reflect the inner world, personal relations, or social and national conflicts. CIMS159401, JWST154401, COML282401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC159401
NELC 168-401 Women in Ancient Egypt Jennifer Houser Wegner TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This class will examine the many roles played by women in ancient Egypt. From goddesses and queens, to wives and mothers, women were a visible presence in ancient Egypt. We will study the lives of famous ancient Egyptian women such as Hatshepsut, Nefertiti and Cleopatra. More independent than many of their contemporaries in neighboring areas, Egyptian women enjoyed greater freedoms in matters of economy and law. By examining the evidence left to us in the literature (including literary texts and non-literary texts such as legal documents, administrative texts and letters), the art, and the archaeological record, we will come away with a better understanding of the position of women in this ancient culture. NELC568401
NELC 180-401 Narrative Across Cultures: Food and Literature Harry Eli Kashdan TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The purpose of this course is to present a variety of narrative genres and to discuss and illustrate the modes whereby they can be analyzed. We will be looking at shorter types of narrative: short stories, novellas, and fables, and also some extracts from longer works such as autobiographies. While some works will come from the Anglo-American tradition, a larger number will be selected from European and non-Western cultural traditions and from earlier time-periods. The course will thus offer ample opportunity for the exploration of the translation of cultural values in a comparative perspective. ENGL103401, COML125401, SAST124401, THAR105401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC180401
NELC 181-401 Introduction To Folklore Dan Ben-Amos TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The purpose of the course is to introduce you to the subjects of the discipline of Folklore, their occurrence in social life and the scholarly analysis of their use in culture. As a discipline folklore explores the manifestations of expressive forms in both traditional and moderns societies, in small-scale groups where people interact with each face-to-face, and in large-scale, often industrial societies, in which the themes, symbols, and forms that permeate traditional life, occupy new positions, or occur in different occasions in everyday life. For some of you the distinction between low and high culture, or artistic and popular art will be helpful in placing folklore forms in modern societies. For others, these distinction will not be helpful. In traditional societies, and within social groups that define themselves ethnically, professionally, or culturally, within modern heterogeneous societies, and traditional societies in the Americas, Africa, Asia, Europe and Australia, folklore plays a more prominent role in society, than it appears to plan in literati cultures on the same continents. Consequently the study of folklore and the analysis of its forms are appropriate in traditional as well as modern societies and any society that is in a transitional phase. COML101401, FOLK101401, RELS108401 Cross Cultural Analysis Humanities & Social Science Sector
NELC 188-401 US and the Middle East Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Foe or friend, Satan or saint - America has often been depicted in the Middle East either as a benevolent superpower or an ill-meaning enemy. In America, too, stereotypes of the Middle East abound as the home of terrorists, falafels, and fanatics. This undergraduate lecture course will explore the relationship between the United States and the Middle East by moving beyond such facile stereotypes. Our goal is to understand why a century of interaction has done little to foster greater understanding between these two societies. By reading novels, memoirs, and historical accounts, we will examine the origins of this cultural and diplomatic encounter in the twentieth century. The readings wills hed light on America's political and economic involvement in the Middle East after the Second World War. We will consider the impact of oil diplomacy on U.S.-Middle East relations, as well as the role of ideology and religion, in our effort to comprehend the current challenges that face these societies. HIST188401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC188401
NELC 201-401 Mod Mideast Lit in Trans Nili R Gold MW 05:15 PM-06:45 PM The Middle East boasts a rich tapestry of cultures that have developed a vibrant body of modern literature that is often overlooked in media coverage of the region. While each of the modern literary traditions that will be surveyed in this introductory course-Arabic, Hebrew, Persian and Turkish-will be analyzed with an appreciation of the cultural context unique to each body of literature, this course will also attempt to bridge these diverse traditions by analyzing common themes-such as modernity, social values, the individual and national identity-as reflected in the genres of poetry, the novel and the short story. This course is in seminar format to encourage lively discussion and is team-taught by four professors whose expertise in modern Middle Eastern literature serves to create a deeper understanding and aesthetic appreciation of each literary tradition. In addition to honing students' literary analysis skills, the course will enable students to become more adept at discussing the social and political forces that are reflected in Middle Eastern literature, explore important themes and actively engage in reading new Middle Eastern works on their own in translation. All readings are in English. COML212401 Arts & Letters Sector https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC201401
NELC 235-301 Food in Islamic Mid East Heather Sharkey M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM In the tenth century, a scholar named Ibn Sayyar al-Warraq produced an Arabic manuscript called Kitab al-Tabikh (The Book of Cooking). This volume, which c ompiled and discussed the recipes of eighth- and ninth-century Islamic rulers (caliphs) and their courts in Iraq, represents the oldest known surviving cookbook of the Arab-Islamic world. Many more such cookbooks followed; in their day they represented an important literary genre among cultured elites. As one food historian recently noted, there are more cookbooks in Arabic from before 1400 than in the rest of the worlds languages put together. Ibn Sayyars cookbook can help us to think about the historical and cultural d ynamics of food. In this class, we will focus on the Middle East across the sweep of the Islamic era, into the modern period, and until the present day, although many of the readings will consider the study of food in other places (including the contemporary United States) for comparative insights. The class will use the historical study of food and foodways as a lens for examining subject s that relate to a wide array of fields and interests. These subjects include economics, agricultural and environmental studies, anthropology, literature, religion, and public health. With regard to the modern era, the course will pay close attention to the consequences of food for shaping memories and identities including religious, ethnic, national, and gender-b ased identities particularly among people who have dispersed or otherwise mig rated. It will also focus considerably on the politics of food, that is, on the place of food in power relations.Among the questions we will debate are these: How does food reflect, shape, or inform history? By approaching the study of Middle Eastern cultures through food, what new or different things can we see? What is the field of food studies, and what can it offer to scholars? What is food writing as a literary form, and what methodological and conceptual ch allenges face those who undertake it? Benjamin Franklin Seminars https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC235301
NELC 241-401 Iraq:Anc Cities& Empires Richard L Zettler W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Iraq: Ancient Cities and Empires is a chronological survey of the ancient civilization that existed in the drainage basin of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers from the early settled village farming communities of the 7th millennium BCE to the middle of the 1st millennium BCE, when Nebuchadnezzar II ruled Babylon and much of the Middle East. Though organized period by period, NELC 241 explores various social, political, economic, and ideological topics, exposing students to various strands of evidence, including settlement survey data, excavated architectural remains, artifacts, and documentary sources, as well as an eclectic mix of theoretical perspectives. The course aims to provide students with a strong foundation for the further study of the ancient and pre-modern Middle East. ANTH636401, NELC641401, URBS236401, ANTH236401
NELC 252-401 Jewish Political Thought Talya Fishman MF 10:15 AM-12:00 PM Course topics will vary; they have included The Binding of Isaac, Responses to Catastrophes in Jewish History, Holy Men & Women (Ben-Amos); Rewriting the Bible (Dohrmann); Performing Judaism (Fishman); Jewish Political Thought (Fishman); Jewish Esotericism (Lorberbaum) Democratic culture assumes the democracy of knowledge - the accessibility of knowledge and its transparency. Should this always be the case? What of harmful knowledge? When are secrets necessary? In traditional Jewish thought, approaching the divine has often assumed an aura of danger. Theological knowledge was thought of as restricted. This seminar will explore the "open" and "closed" in theological knowledge, as presented in central texts of the rabbinic tradition: the Mishnah, Maimonides and the Kabbalah. Primary sources will be available in both Hebrew and English. NELC552401, FOLK252401, JWST100401, RELS129401 History & Tradition Sector https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC252401
NELC 257-401 Women in the Bible Yael Landman TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The Hebrew Bible stands as the basis of the three most influential monotheistic religions. In recent years these religions have come under attack for promoting misogyny and advancing a patriarchal worldview. The extent to which the allegations of misogyny and promulgation of a patriarchal power structure can be traced back to the Bible will be investigated in this course. This is done by investigating the role women play in the narratives and legal materials found in the Bible. Utilizing modern biblical criticism, we analyze stories such as the expulsion from Eden, the matriarchs, and the rape of Dinah. We also examine the status of women as sisters, wives and mothers while taking into consideration the contributions women made to prophecy and leadership. Finally, a more abstract conceptualization of the feminine in poetry and wisdom writings will be explored. The study of biblical women will not only allow for a renewed appreciation of the feminine in the Bible, it will also lead to an improved understanding of male characters against which the women of the Bible are often cast. NELC657401, RELS257401, JWST254401
NELC 282-403 Migration in the Medieval Mediterranean, 450-1450 Joel Pattison MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This seminar offers an introduction to Muslim political thought. Chrnologically the course ranges from the medieval period to the present. Particular attention will be given in the later part of the coruse to the renaissance of Muslim potical thought in recent years and to the development of politicial Islam, including the work of such thinkers as Said Qutb and Hasan Turabi. We will also study the roots of this renaissance in classical philosophy of the medieval period (Al Farabi, Al Ghazali, Ibn Khaldun, Ibn Tufayl) and the liberal age. HIST232403 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC282403
NELC 286-401 Living World in Archaeological Science Katherine M Moore
Chantel E. White
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food. ANTH567401, ANTH267401, CLST568401, CLST268401, NELC586401 Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Objects-Based Learning Course
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC286401
NELC 287-401 Ethnic Humor Dan Ben-Amos TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Humor in ethnic societies has two dimensions: internal and external. The inside humor of an ethnic group is accessible to its members; it draws upon their respective social structures, historical and social experiences, languages, cultural symbols, and social and economic circumstances and aspirations. The external humor of an ethnic group targets members of other ethnic groups, and draws upon their stereotypes, and attributed characteristics by other ethnic groups. The external ethnic humor flourishes in immigrant and ethnically heterogenic societies. In both cases jokes and humor are an integral part of social interaction, and in their performance relate to the social, economic, and political dynamics of traditional and modern societies. FOLK202401, COML287401
NELC 315-401 Land/Sea Asian Migration Neelam Khoja T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM In this course we will explore how migration shaped and connected Asia by land and transoceanic routes from the seventh to eighteenth centuries. In this course we will trace people moving across long spans of space, which includes merchants, soldiers, pilgrims, laborers, pirates, spies, and travelers. We will examine how cultural, religious, economic, and political institutions enabled and benefited from migration; how towns, ports, and cities developed and supported migration; how individuals and communities understood and documented their experiences about what it meant to be mobile and/or foreign; and theories of migration that help us make sense of a premodern global Asia. Sample readings include Abdul Sheriff's "Dhow Culture of the Indian Ocean: Cosmopolitanism, Commerce and Islam"; Janet L. Abu- Lughod's "Before European Hegemony: The World System A.D. 1250-1350"; and selections from the "Asia Inside Out" series ("Itinerant People", "Connected Places", and "Changing Times") edited by Helen Siu and Eric Tagliacozzo. An early assignment for the students is a map exercise. Students will be asked to create a map that highlights migration across Asia based on readings for the week. Students will be trained in an online mapmaking application and will work in pairs to create layers that address different aspects and forms of migration. SAST315401, SAST515401, NELC515401
NELC 337-401 Jewish Magic Simcha Gross T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM The Hebrew Bible legislates against magic and witchcraft. But Jewish literature is replete with demons, witches, spells and incantations. This course will examine the phenomenon of Jewish magic in the longue duree. We will explore a wide array of sources describing ancient Jewish magical practices, and attempt to reconstruct the various aspects of ancient Jewish magic. We will start with demonology and exorcism in biblical and Second Temple literature. Then we will examine rabbinic attitudes towards magic and sorcery and rabbinic magical recipes. We then turn to material artifacts: late antique Jewish amulets and magic bowls. Finally we will survey the large corpus of magical texts from the Cairo Geniza and Hebrew manuscripts of magic from the middle ages. During the course we will consider broader questions such as the relationships between magic and religion, the identity of the Jewish magicians and their clients, relationship between Jewish and contemporary non-Jewish magic, and the role of women in magical practice. JWST337401
NELC 359-401 Sem Modern Hebrew Lit: Autobiography in Literature, Amichai Nili R Gold W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course introduces students to selections from the best literary works written in Hebrew over the last hundred years in a relaxed seminar environment. The goal of the course is to develop skills in critical reading of literature in general, and to examine how Hebrew authors grapple with crucial questions of human existence and national identity. Topics include: Hebrew classics and their modern "descendents," autobiography in poetry and fiction, the conflict between literary generations, and others. Because the content of this course changes from year to year, students may take it for credit more than once. This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew. Grading is based primarily on participation and students' literary understanding. COML359401, JWST359401, JWST659401, NELC659401 Arts & Letters Sector https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC359401
NELC 402-401 Beginning Hindi-Urdu II Josh Pien MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This introductory course core proficiency in Hindi-Urdu up to the intermediat level. It is designed for students with little or no prior exposure to Hindi or Urdu. The course covers all four language skills (speaking, lsitening, reading, and writing) and all three models of communication (interpersonal, presentational, interpretive). Students will develop literacy skills in the primary script of their choice (Hindi or Urdu script). All written materials will be provided in both scripts. All meetings are interactive and students acquire the language by using it in realistic contexts. Culture is embedded in the activities and is also introduced through various authentic materials. HIND401401, URDU402401
NELC 431-401 Language & Literature: Advanced Urdu-Language and Literature Mustafa A Menai TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course is designed to give in-depth exposure to some of the finest works of classical and modern Urdu prose and poetry along with the historical and socio-political trends they represent. Figures covered range from Ghalib (b.1797) to Faiz, Fehmida Riaz, and post 9/11 Urdu prose and poetry. The course is open to both undergraduates and graduate students, subject to having intermediate level proficiency. The course is repeatable, and hte content changes every semester. Multi-media content such as music, videos, blogs etc. will be actively incorporated. Every effort will be made to accommidate individual interests. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor with any questions, or if they are unsure about eligibility. URDU431401 Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 451-401 Jews & Judaism in Antqty Simcha Gross TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM A broad introduction to the history of Jewish civilization from its Biblical beginnings to the Middle Ages, with the main focus on the formative period of classical rabbinic Judaism and on the symbiotic relationship between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. JWST156401, HIST139401, NELC051401, RELS120401
NELC 458-401 Medieval Jewish Writings Talya Fishman MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Through close readings of primary sources, students will explore products of Jewish culture written in both Christian and Muslim lands between the 10th and 16th centuries, within their historical and cross-cultural contexts. Works will include selections from poetry, philosophy, Bible exegesis, polemic, ethical wills, historiography, pietism, mysticism and legal writings. Students with appropriate language skills will read Hebrew sources in the original. Graduate students will have additional assignments and meetings. NELC158401, JWST153401, COML257401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC458401
NELC 515-401 Land/Sea Asian Migration Neelam Khoja T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM In this course we will explore how migration shaped and connected Asia by land and transoceanic routes from the seventh to eighteenth centuries. In this course we will trace people moving across long spans of space, which includes merchants, soldiers, pilgrims, laborers, pirates, spies, and travelers. We will examine how cultural, religious, economic, and political institutions enabled and benefited from migration; how towns, ports, and cities developed and supported migration; how individuals and communities understood and documented their experiences about what it meant to be mobile and/or foreign; and theories of migration that help us make sense of a premodern global Asia. Sample readings include Abdul Sheriff's "Dhow Culture of the Indian Ocean: Cosmopolitanism, Commerce and Islam"; Janet L. Abu- Lughod's "Before European Hegemony: The World System A.D. 1250-1350"; and selections from the "Asia Inside Out" series ("Itinerant People", "Connected Places", and "Changing Times") edited by Helen Siu and Eric Tagliacozzo. An early assignment for the students is a map exercise. Students will be asked to create a map that highlights migration across Asia based on readings for the week. Students will be trained in an online mapmaking application and will work in pairs to create layers that address different aspects and forms of migration. SAST315401, SAST515401, NELC315401
NELC 538-401 Manuscript Arts in the Islamic World Marianna Simpson W 10:15 AM-01:15 PM This hands-on seminar will explore the long tradition of manuscript-making and manuscript-makers in the Islamic world, using the extensive collections of Arab, Persian, Turkish and Indian volumes at the University of Pennsylvania and the Free Library of Philadelphia. These include copies of the Qur'an (Islam's holy text) and other religious, scientific, historical and literary texts. Emphasis will be placed on traditional materials and artistic techniques, specifically calligraphy, binding, illumination and illustration, as well as on production methods and the historical, social, and economic contexts in which manuscripts were made, used and collected from early Islamic times to the early modern period. Also at issue will be the ways that Islamic manuscripts were transformed over the centuries as they journeyed from their diverse places of origin (Egypt, Morocco, Syria, Iran, India, etc.) to Philadelphia. The goal is the art historical skills involved in the study of Islamic codices, through close examination, discussion and presentation, and to recognize that every manuscript has a story. Most of the class sessions will be held either at the Kislak Center in Van Pelt Library or at the Free Library on the Parkway. ARTH536401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Objects-Based Learning Course
NELC 552-401 Themes Jewish Tradition Talya Fishman MF 10:15 AM-12:00 PM Course topics will vary; they have included: Holy Men & Women (Ben-Amos); Rewriting the Bible (Dohrmann); Jewish Political Thought & Action (Fishman) When did the Bible become the Bible? What was the nature of canon and authority in early Israel and Judaism, and how did biblical communities think about their sacred texts? How and what did the Bible mean to ancient readers? The answers to these questions are varied and surprising. This course looks at early biblical and Jewish texts that both write and re-write the tradition's own central texts. We will think widely and creatively about ancient textuality, orality, interpretation, composition, and authority. Drawing on literary theory, the course will examine the ways that biblical and post-biblical literature from the Second Temple to the rabbinic period (with some forays into contemporary literature) manifest complex ideas about power, meaning, and religiousity in early Judaism. NELC252401, FOLK252401, JWST100401, RELS129401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC552401
NELC 568-401 Women in Ancient Egypt Jennifer Houser Wegner TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This class will examine the many roles played by women in ancient Egypt. From goddesses and queens, to wives and mothers, women were a visible presence in ancient Egypt. We will study the lives of famous ancient Egyptian women such as Hatshepsut, Nefertiti and Cleopatra. More independent than many of their contemporaries in neighboring areas, Egyptian women enjoyed greater freedoms in matters of economy and law. By examining the evidence left to us in the literature (including literary texts and non-literary texts such as legal documents, administrative texts and letters), the art, and the archaeological record, we will come away with a better understanding of the position of women in this ancient culture. NELC168401
NELC 572-401 Archaeogeophysics Jason Herrmann W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Near-surface geophysical prospection methods are now widely used in archaeology as they allow archaeologists to rapidly map broad areas, minimize or avoid destructive excavation, and perceive physical dimensions of archaeological features that are outside of the range of human perception. This course will cover the theory of geophysical sensors commonly used in archaeological investigations and the methods for collecting, processing, and interpreting geophysical data from archaeological contexts. We will review the physical properties of common archaeological and paleoenvironmental targets, the processes that led to their deposition and formation, and how human activity is reflected in anomalies recorded through geophysical survey through lectures, readings, and discussion. Students will gain experience collecting data in the field with various sensors at archaeological sites in the region. A large proportion of the course will be computer-based as students work with data from geophysical sensors, focusing on the fundamentals of data processing, data fusion, and interpretation. Some familiarity with GIS is recommended. AAMW572401, ANTH572401, CLST572401 An Academically Based Community Serv Course
NELC 586-401 Living World in Archaeological Science Katherine M Moore
Chantel E. White
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food. ANTH567401, ANTH267401, CLST568401, CLST268401, NELC286401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
Objects-Based Learning Course
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC586401
NELC 587-401 Archaeometallurgy Semnr F 08:30 AM-11:30 AM This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of archaeological metals. Topics to be discussed include: exploitation of ore and its transformation to metal in ancient times, distribution of metal as a raw materials, provenance studies, development and organization of early metallurgy, and interdisciplinary investigations of metals and related artifacts like slag and crucibles. Students will become familiar with the full spectrum of analytical procedures, ranging from microscopy for materials characterization to mass spectrometry for geochemical fingerprinting, and will work on individual research projects analyzing archaeological objects following the analytical methodology of archaeometallurgy. ANTH552401, CLST552401, AAMW552401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC587401
NELC 618-401 Iran Cinema:Gend/Pol/Rel Mahyar Entezari TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This seminar explores Iranian culture, art, history and politics through film in the contemporary era. We will examine a variety of works that represent the social, political, economic and cultural circumstances of post-revolutionary Iran. Along the way, we will discuss issues pertaining to gender, religion, nationalism, ethnicity, and the function of cinema in present day Iranian society. Films to be discussed will be by internationally acclaimed filmmakers, such as Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Tahmineh Milani, Jafar Panahi, Bahman Ghobadi, among others. CIMS118401, GSWS118401, NELC118401 Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 641-401 Iraq:Anc Cities& Empires Richard L Zettler W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course consists of an analytical survey of civilization in the ancient Mesopotamia from prehistoric periods to the middle centuries of the first millennium B.C. A strong focus is placed on Mesopotamia (Iraq, eastern Syria) proper, but it occasionally covers its adjacent regions, including Anatolia (Turkey), north-central Syria, and the Levantine coast. As we chronologically examine the origin and development of civilization in the region, various social, political, economic, and ideological topics will be explored, including subsistence, cosmology, writing, trade, technology, war, private life, burial custom, and empire. Based on both archaeological and historical evidence, these topics will be examined from archaeological, anthropological, historical and art historical perspectives. Students will be exposed to a variety of theoretical approaches and types of relevant evidence, including settlement survey data, excavated architectural remains and artifacts, and written documents. The course aims to provide students with a strong foundation for further study in Near Eastern civilization. ANTH636401, NELC241401, URBS236401, ANTH236401
NELC 657-401 Women in the Bible Yael Landman TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The Hebrew Bible stands as the basis of the three most influential monotheistic religions. In recent years these religions have come under attack for promoting misogyny and advancing a patriarchal worldview. The extent to which the allegations of misogyny and promulgation of a patriarchal power structure can be traced back to the Bible will be investigated in this course. This is done by investigating the role women play in the narratives and legal materials found in the Bible. Utilizing modern biblical criticism, we analyze stories such as the expulsion from Eden, the matriarchs, and the rape of Dinah. We also examine the status of women as sisters, wives and mothers while taking into consideration the contributions women made to prophecy and leadership. Finally, a more abstract conceptualization of the feminine in poetry and wisdom writings will be explored. The study of biblical women will not only allow for a renewed appreciation of the feminine in the Bible, it will also lead to an improved understanding of male characters against which the women of the Bible are often cast. NELC257401, RELS257401, JWST254401
NELC 659-401 Giants of Hebrew Lit Nili R Gold W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM This course introduces students to selections from the best literary works written in Hebrew over the last hundred years in a relaxed seminar environment. The goal of the course is to develop skills in critical reading of literature in general, and to examine how Hebrew authors grapple with crucial questions of human existence and national identity. Topics include: Hebrew classics and their modern "descendents," autobiography in poetry and fiction, the conflict between literary generations, and others. Because the content of this course changes from year to year, students may take it for credit more than once. This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew. Grading is based primarily on participation and students' literary understanding. COML359401, JWST359401, JWST659401, NELC359401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC659401
NELC 668-401 Art & Architr Anc Egypt David P Silverman M 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
W 01:45 PM-03:15 PM
This course will be an introduction to the art, architecture and minor arts that were produced during the three thousand years of ancient Egyptian history. This material will be presented in its cultural and historical contexts through illustrated lectures and will include visits to the collection of the University Museum. NELC068401, ARTH218401, ARTH618401, AAMW618401, ANCH068401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=NELC668401
PERS 012-401 Elem Persian II Mahyar Entezari TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
This course is designed to help you build upon what you have learned in Elementary Persian I. Emphasis is placed on using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. Therefore use of English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing-as well as culture, vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation-are integrated into the course. Students must either have successfully completed PERS 011, or take the departmental exam. PERS612401
PERS 014-401 Intermed Persian II Mahyar Entezari TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM In this course, we will continue to address a broader variety of cultural topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is place on actively using Persian for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore use of English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students must either have successfully completed PERS 013 or PERS 017, or take the departmental placement exam. PERS614401
PERS 016-680 Advanced Persian II Azita Hamedani Kamkar MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM PERS616680
PERS 040-680 Intro To Sorani Kurdish Azita Hamedani Kamkar MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Introduction to Sorani Kurdish is an introductory-level course designed to help you start learning Sorani Kurdish and to give you the necessary tools to continue your study of Kurdish language. This course introduces the Kurdish alphabet (Arabic script) alongside grammar and vocabulary. Toward the end of the semester, the course will also involve some Kurdish classical and modern poetry. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. The four language skills (i.e., listening, speaking, reading, and writing) as well as pronunciation and culture are integrated into the curriculum. There is no prerequisite. PERS640680
PERS 612-401 Elem Persian II Mahyar Entezari TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
W 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
This course is designed to help you build upon what you have learned in Elementary Persian I. Emphasis is placed on using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. Therefore use of English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing-as well as culture, vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation-are integrated into the course. Students must either have successfully completed PERS 611, or take the departmental exam. PERS012401
PERS 614-401 Intermed Persian II Mahyar Entezari TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM In this course, we will continue to address a broader variety of cultural topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is place on actively using Persian for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore use of English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students must either have successfully completed PERS 613 or PERS 617, or take the departmental placement exam. PERS014401
PERS 616-680 Advanced Persian II Azita Hamedani Kamkar MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM PERS016680
PERS 640-680 Intro To Sorani Kurdish Azita Hamedani Kamkar MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Introduction to Sorani Kurdish is an introductory-level course designed to help you start learning Sorani Kurdish and to give you the necessary tools to continue your study of Kurdish language. This course introduces the Kurdish alphabet (Arabic script) alongside grammar and vocabulary. Toward the end of the semester, the course will also involve some Kurdish classical and modern poetry. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. The four language skills (i.e., listening, speaking, reading, and writing) as well as pronunciation and culture are integrated into the curriculum. There is no prerequisite. PERS040680
TURK 022-401 Elem Turkish II Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 12:00 PM-01:45 PM This course is a continuation of TURK 021 and is designed to strengthen and extend students' listening, speaking, reading and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of Turkish people in Turkey. By the end of this course, students will be able to handle a variety of day to day needs in Turkish-speaking settings and engage in simple conversations. Students can expect to be able to order food and drinks, purchase things, and to be able to be familiar with current social topics. Students will be able to talk about all tenses, present, future, past, past continuous, make comparisons, describe people and things in detail, make travel plans, make reservations in hotels and holiday resorts, write complaint letters. By the end of the course, students will be able to talk about their studies and their plans for the future. Also, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them to understand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Students will learn practical life in Turkey and will explore Turkish culture on the internet. TURK622401
TURK 024-401 Intermed Turkish II Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 10:15 AM-12:00 PM Expands students writing and speaking competence in Turkish, increases vocabulary, and helps students' practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our In-class discussions are based on role-plays and weekly readings and news reports from TV and newspapers. We create Discussion wil take place in this course and let them and students will communicate through, threaded discussions, chat rooms and skype. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students' will, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar will be extended through specific grammar exercises. They Students will have the opportunity to practice and read about the cultural and historical issues and get prepared for an advanced level Turkish. TURK624401
TURK 122-680 Adv Turk Cult&Media II Feride Servet Hatiboglu T 05:15 PM-07:15 PM Similar to TURK 212, Advanced Turkish Culture & Media I, in this course students also will have exposure to social Turkish clubs and to establish their own. They will arrange their Turkish tea parties and learn about Turkish cuisine. Expose Turkish daily news and media will be discussed in class. Students will have chance to interview interview Turkish businessman, writer, journalists in class and/or skype or zoom people in Turkish. Team spirit or ethics with those of the United States. Students will present and prepare a drama. Mainly students will create and decide their activities and discussions. and the instructor will just monitor them most of time. They will continue watching Turkish movies and expose to Turkish culture through these films. After each movie discussions and essay writings will be expected. TURK522680 Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
TURK 228-680 Structure of Turkish Daisy Braverman CANCELED The course would start with a brief introduction to Turkic languages and the place of Turkish in relation to them. This would be followed by information about the Turkic language family's relationship to that of other languages in the context of historical linguistics; the teaching of some of this discipline's principles would be involved. After a brief presentation of the development of Turkish, involving the influence of other languages on it, we would focus on the phonology of Turkish, including phonemes, allophones and vowel harmony. A large part of the course would be devoted to morphology, comprising of suffixes and their function. Finally, syntax, including idiom formation and use would be explored. TURK528680
TURK 229-401 Ottoman Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu R 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is an introduction to Ottoman Turkish with basic characteristics. Ottoman Turkish through readings in printed selections will be exercised with different techniques. Students will learn Persian and Arabic effects on Ottoman Turkish. They will be able to read simple texts at the end of this course. General information on Ottoman Turkish will be given to students during this course. This course will be offered one semester during the school year. Two semesters of Turkish and two semeters of Arabic or Persian or four semsters of Turkish or equivalent. Two semesters of Turkish and two semesters of Arabic or Persian OR four semesters of Turkish or equivalent recommended. Course is not open to auditors. TURK629401
TURK 522-680 Adv Turk Cult&Media II Feride Servet Hatiboglu T 05:15 PM-07:15 PM This course is TURK 122 for graduate students. TURK122680
TURK 528-680 Structure of Turkish Daisy Braverman CANCELED TURK228680
TURK 622-401 Elem Turkish II Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 12:00 PM-01:45 PM This course is TURK 022 for graduate students. TURK022401
TURK 624-401 Intermed Turkish II Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 10:15 AM-12:00 PM This course is TURK 024 for graduate students. TURK024401
TURK 629-401 Ottoman Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu R 02:00 PM-05:00 PM This course is an introduction to Ottoman Turkish with basic characteristics. Ottoman Turkish through readings in printed selections will be exercised with different techniques. Students will learn Persian and Arabic effects on Ottoman Turkish. They will be able to read simple texts at the end of this course. General information on Ottoman Turkish will be given to students during this course. This course will be offered one semester during the school year. Two semesters of Turkish and two semesters of Arabic or Persian OR four semesters of Turkish or equivalent recommended. TURK229401