Courses for Fall 2022

Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
ANEL 4000-401 First Year Akkadian I Joshua A Jeffers MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Introduction to the grammar of the Akkadian language with emphasis on developing skills in the cuneiform writing system and reading of selected texts. ANEL6000401
ANEL 4300-401 Akkadian Historical Texts Joshua A Jeffers Readings in Akkadian historical texts from ancient Mesopotamia ANEL6300401
ANEL 4420-401 Sumerian Daily Texts Stephen J Tinney Reading administrative and economic texts in the Sumerian Language from ancient Mesopotamia. ANEL7300401
ANEL 4600-001 Middle Egyptian Texts David P Silverman W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This course will deal with those texts of the Middle Kingdom that are written in the classical form of the language. It will include both monumental inscriptions, such as autobiographical stela inscriptions (P. Newberry, BENI HASSAN) and stelae (Seth, LESESTUCKE) as well as narratives in prose (DeBuck, READING BOOK). Religious texts (ibid. and COFFIN TEXTS) will also be studied and analyzed. Distinctions between the grammar of the literary and non-literary genres will be discussed.
ANEL 6000-401 First Year Akkadian I Joshua A Jeffers MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Introduction to the grammar of the Akkadian language with emphasis on developing skills in the cuneiform writing system and reading of selected texts. ANEL4000401
ANEL 6300-401 Akkadian Historical Texts Joshua A Jeffers Readings in Akkadian historical texts from ancient Mesopotamia ANEL4300401
ANEL 7300-401 Sumerian Daily Texts Stephen J Tinney Reading administrative and economic texts in the Sumerian Language from ancient Mesopotamia. ANEL4420401
ARAB 0100-401 Elementary Arabic I TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB6100401
ARAB 0100-402 Elementary Arabic I MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB6100402
ARAB 0100-403 Elementary Arabic I TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB6100403
ARAB 0300-401 Intermediate Arabic III Mbarek Sryfi TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
This is the continuation of the Elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students range from Intermediate Low to Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. ARAB6300401
ARAB 0300-402 Intermediate Arabic III MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
This is the continuation of the Elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students range from Intermediate Low to Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. ARAB6300402
ARAB 0500-401 Advanced Intermediate Arabic I Mbarek Sryfi MTWR 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This is a proficiency-based course which builds on the lessons from Intermediate Arabic. Emphasis continues to be on all four language skills: Speaking, Listening, Reading, & Writing. The readings for the class are chosen from actual texts from both medieval and modern Arabic in a variety of fields and subjects. Students will be expected to give classroom presentations and to write short essays in Arabic. Evaluation will be both Achievement- and proficiency- based. ARAB6500401
ARAB 6100-401 Elementary Arabic I MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB0100401
ARAB 6100-402 Elementary Arabic I MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB0100402
ARAB 6100-403 Elementary Arabic I MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
This is the beginners course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It will introduce you to the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the standard means of communication in the Arab World. The course is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. Evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, dictations, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that by the end of this course, students will range in proficiency from Novice High to Intermediate Low on the ACTFL scale; in other words (using the terminology of the government's Foreign Service Institute), from 'incipient survival' to 'full' survival' in the native-speaking environment. ARAB0100403
ARAB 6300-401 Intermediate Arabic III Mbarek Sryfi TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
This is the continuation of the Elementary course at the graduate level. This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. This is the continuation of ARAB 0100 and ARAB 0200, the elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. As in ARAB 0100 - ARAB 0200, evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students range from Intermediate Low to Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. ARAB0300401
ARAB 6300-402 Intermediate Arabic III MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
This is the continuation of the Elementary course at the graduate level. This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. This is the continuation of ARAB 0100 and ARAB 0200, the elementary course in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This course is also proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the course are aimed at placing you, the learner, in the context of the native-speaking environment from the very beginning. As in ARAB 0100 - ARAB 0200, evaluation is done by the more traditional testing methods (vocabulary tests, grammar and translation exercises). We anticipate that students range from Intermediate Low to Intermediate High according to the ACTFL scale. ARAB0300402
ARAB 6500-401 Advanced Intermediate Arabic I Mbarek Sryfi MTWR 8:30 AM-9:29 AM This is a proficiency-based course which continues from the first intermediate course, ARAB 0300/ARAB 0400. Emphasis continues to be on all four language skills: Speaking, Listening, Reading, & Writing. The readings for the class are chosen from actual texts from both medieval and modern Arabic in a variety of fields and subjects. Students will be expected to give classroom presentations and to write short essays in Arabic. Evaluation will be both Achievement- and proficiency- based. ARAB0500401
HEBR 0100-401 Elementary Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. A grade of B- or higher is needed to continue in the language. HEBR5100401, JWST0100401
HEBR 0100-402 Elementary Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. A grade of B- or higher is needed to continue in the language. HEBR5100402, JWST0100402
HEBR 0150-401 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I CANCELED This course is an introduction to Biblical Hebrew. It assumes no prior knowledge, but students who can begin to acquire a reading knowledge of the Hebrew alphabet before class starts will find it extremely helpful. The course is the 1st of a 4-semester sequence whose purpose is to prepare students to take courses in Bible that demand a familiarity with the original language of the text. HEBR5150401, JWST0150401
HEBR 0200-401 Elementary Modern Hebrew II Ibrahim Miari MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM A continuation of first semester Elementary Modern Hebrew, which assumes basic skills of reading and speaking and the use of the present tense. Open to all students who have completed one semester of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. HEBR5200401, JWST0200401
HEBR 0300-401 Intermediate Modern Hebrew III Joseph L Benatov MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. HEBR5300401, JWST0300401
HEBR 0300-402 Intermediate Modern Hebrew III Joseph L Benatov MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. HEBR5300402, JWST0300402
HEBR 0350-401 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I This course will focus on using the grammar and vocabulary learned at the introductory level to enable students to read Biblical texts independently and take advanced Bible exegesis courses. We will also work on getting comfortable with the standard dictionaries, concordances, and grammars used by scholars of the Bible. We will concentrate on prose this semester, closely reading Ruth, Jonah, and other prose selections. We will begin to translate from English into Biblical Hebrew, and there will also be a unit on the punctuation marks used in the Bible. This is a suitable entry point for students who already have strong Hebrew skills. HEBR5350401, JWST0350401
HEBR 0400-401 Intermediate Modern Hebrew IV Joseph L Benatov MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course constitutes the final semester of Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Hence, one of the main goals of the course is to prepare the students for the proficiency exam in Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar skills and ability to read literary texts. Open to all students who have completed three semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. HEBR5400401, JWST0400401
HEBR 5100-401 Elementary Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. A grade of B- or higher is needed to proceed to the next level. HEBR0100401, JWST0100401
HEBR 5100-402 Elementary Modern Hebrew I Ibrahim Miari MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM An introduction to the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew. This course assumes no previous knowledge of Hebrew. A grade of B- or higher is needed to proceed to the next level. HEBR0100402, JWST0100402
HEBR 5150-401 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I CANCELED This course is an introduction to Biblical Hebrew. It assumes no prior knowledge, but students who can begin to acquire a reading knowledge of the Hebrew alphabet before class starts will find it extremely helpful. The course is the 1st of a 4-semester sequence whose purpose is to prepare students to take courses in Bible that demand a familiarity with the original language of the text. HEBR0150401, JWST0150401
HEBR 5200-401 Elementary Modern Hebrew II Ibrahim Miari MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM A continuation of Elementary Modern Hebrew I, which assumes basic skills of reading and speaking and the use of the present tense. Open to all students who have completed one semester of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. HEBR0200401, JWST0200401
HEBR 5300-401 Intermediate Modern Hebrew III Joseph L Benatov MTWR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. HEBR0300401, JWST0300401
HEBR 5300-402 Intermediate Modern Hebrew III Joseph L Benatov MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM Development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversing in modern Hebrew on an intermediate level. Open to all students who have completed two semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. HEBR0300402, JWST0300402
HEBR 5350-401 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I This course will focus on using the grammar and vocabulary learned at the introductory level to enable students to read Biblical texts independently and take advanced Bible exegesis courses. We will also work on getting comfortable with the standard dictionaries, concordances, and grammars used by scholars of the Bible. We will concentrate on prose this semester, closely reading Ruth, Jonah, and other prose selections. We will begin to translate from English into Biblical Hebrew, and there will also be a unit on the punctuation marks used in the Bible. This is a suitable entry point for students who already have strong Hebrew skills. HEBR0350401, JWST0350401
HEBR 5400-401 Intermediate Modern Hebrew IV Joseph L Benatov MTWR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course constitutes the final semester of Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Hence, one of the main goals of the course is to prepare the students for the proficiency exam in Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar skills and ability to read literary texts. Open to all students who have completed three semesters of Hebrew at Penn with a grade of B- or above and new students with equivalent competency. HEBR0400401, JWST0400401
NELC 0001-401 Introduction to the Ancient Near East TR 3:30 PM-4:29 PM The great pyramids and mysterious mummies of Egypt, the fabled Tower of Babel, and the laws of the Babylonian king Hammurabi are some of the things that might come to mind when you think of the ancient Near East. Yet these are only a very few of the many fascinating -- and at time perplexing -- aspects of the civilizations that flourished there c. 3300-300 BCE. This is where writing first developed, where people thought that the gods wrote down what would happen in the future on the lungs and livers of sacrificed sheep, and where people knew how to determine the length of hypotenuse a thousand years before the Greek Pythagoras was born. During this course, we will learn more about these other matters and discover their place in the cultures and civilizations of that area. This is an interdisciplinary survey of the history, society and culture of the ancient Near East, in particular Egypt and Mesopotamia, utilizing extensive readings from ancient texts in translation (including the Epic of Gilgamesh, "one of the great masterpieces of world literature"), but also making use of archaeological and art historical materials. The goal of the course is to gain an appreciation of the various societies of the time, to understand some of their great achievements, to become acquainted with some of the fascinating individuals of the time (such as Hatshepsut, "the women pharaoh," and Akhenaten, "the heretic king"), and to appreciate the rich heritage that they have left us. ANCH0100401, HIST0730401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0001-402 Introduction to the Ancient Near East F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM The great pyramids and mysterious mummies of Egypt, the fabled Tower of Babel, and the laws of the Babylonian king Hammurabi are some of the things that might come to mind when you think of the ancient Near East. Yet these are only a very few of the many fascinating -- and at time perplexing -- aspects of the civilizations that flourished there c. 3300-300 BCE. This is where writing first developed, where people thought that the gods wrote down what would happen in the future on the lungs and livers of sacrificed sheep, and where people knew how to determine the length of hypotenuse a thousand years before the Greek Pythagoras was born. During this course, we will learn more about these other matters and discover their place in the cultures and civilizations of that area. This is an interdisciplinary survey of the history, society and culture of the ancient Near East, in particular Egypt and Mesopotamia, utilizing extensive readings from ancient texts in translation (including the Epic of Gilgamesh, "one of the great masterpieces of world literature"), but also making use of archaeological and art historical materials. The goal of the course is to gain an appreciation of the various societies of the time, to understand some of their great achievements, to become acquainted with some of the fascinating individuals of the time (such as Hatshepsut, "the women pharaoh," and Akhenaten, "the heretic king"), and to appreciate the rich heritage that they have left us. ANCH0100402, HIST0730402 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0050-401 Ancient Civilizations of the World Richard L Zettler TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM This course explores the archaeology (material culture) of early complex societies or civilizations in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Aegean. According to the traditional paradigm, civilization first emerged during the fourth millennium BCE in Egypt and Mesopotamia. In the Mediterranean, state-level societies first appeared in Crete and mainland Greece in the early second millennium BCE. This course investigates how and why these civilizations developed, as well as their appearance and structure in the early historic (or literate) phases of their existence. A comparative perspective will illustrate what these early civilizations have in common and the ways in which they are unique. This course will consist largely of lectures which will outline classic archaeological and anthropological theories on state formation, before turning to examine the available archaeological (and textual) data on emerging complexity in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Aegean. This course does not presuppose any knowledge of archaeology or ancient languages; the instructor will provide any background necessary. Because this is a course on material culture, some of the class periods will be spent at the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. These will consist of a guided tour of a relevant gallery, as well as a hands-on object-based lab with archaeological materials selected by the instructor. ANTH0105401, URBS0050401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0300-401 Introduction to the Bible: The Old Testament David Q Daniels WR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM An introduction to the major themes and ideas of the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament), with attention to the contributions of archaeology and modern Biblical scholarship, including Biblical criticism and the response to it in Judaism and Christianity. All readings are in English. JWST0303401, RELS0301401 Humanties & Social Science Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0305-401 Great Books of Judaism: Medieval Jewish Bookshelf Talya Fishman MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM Since the early medieval period, Jews have been known as "the People of the Book". Yet the books they produced and consumed changed drastically over time and place, spanning a variety of known genres and inventing new ones. These works, in turn, shaped the texts, ideas, and lives of Jews and others for millennia, spawned vast commentary traditions, and inspired new works. This course engages prominent Jewish texts, such as the Hebrew Bible, Rabbinic Literature, the works of major medieval philosophers, pre-modern intellectuals, and modern authors, situating them in their literary, cultural, and social contexts, and examining their later reception. JWST0305401, NELC5210401, RELS0305401 Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NELC0305401
NELC 0320-401 Modern Hebrew Literature and Culture in Translation: Literary Giants Pre & Post 1948 Nili R Gold W 10:15 AM-1:14 PM This course juxtaposes Hebrew writings from the first half of the 20th century with the avant-garde works of film, poetry, and prose that disrupted them. The central pillars of the Modern Hebrew literary canon, like H. N. Bialik and the Nobel Prize Laureate S. Y. Agnon, drew from the ancient wells of classical texts while providing future generations with the tools to express modern and post-modern sensibilities. Yehuda Amichai and his contemporaries epitomize in poetry the rebellion of Israeli authors in the 1950s against the glorification of nationalism and sacrifice. The fiction of A. B. Yehoshua, Aharon Appelfeld and Amos Oz followed the poets’ lead. Together they forged the future of Hebrew literature. Later, their sensibilities were reflected in film, sometimes in films that adapted their prose to the screen. Masks are required in this course. CIMS0320401, CIMS0320401, COML0320401, COML0320401, JWST0320401, JWST0320401 Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NELC0320401
NELC 0355-401 Medieval and Early Modern Jewry Anne O Albert CANCELED Exploration of intellectual, social, and cultural developments in Jewish civilization from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the assault on established conceptions of faith and religious authority in 17th century Europe, that is, from the age of Mohammed to that of Spinoza. Particular attention will be paid to the interaction of Jewish culture with those of Christianity and Islam. HIST1610401, HIST1610401, JWST1610401, JWST1610401, RELS1610401, RELS1610401 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
NELC 0360-401 Jews in the Modern World Beth S Wenger TR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course offers an intensive survey of the major currents in Jewish culture and society from the late middle ages to the present. Focusing upon the different societies in which Jews have lived, the course explores Jewish responses to the political, socio-economic, and cultural challenges of modernity.Topics to be covered include the political emancipation of Jews, the creation of new religious movements within Judaism, Jewish socialism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and the emergence of new Jewish communities in Israel and the United States. No prior background in Jewish history is expected. HIST1710401, JWST1710401, RELS1710401 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=HIST1710401
NELC 0360-402 Jews in the Modern World F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course offers an intensive survey of the major currents in Jewish culture and society from the late middle ages to the present. Focusing upon the different societies in which Jews have lived, the course explores Jewish responses to the political, socio-economic, and cultural challenges of modernity.Topics to be covered include the political emancipation of Jews, the creation of new religious movements within Judaism, Jewish socialism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and the emergence of new Jewish communities in Israel and the United States. No prior background in Jewish history is expected. HIST1710402, JWST1710402, RELS1710402 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
NELC 0360-403 Jews in the Modern World F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course offers an intensive survey of the major currents in Jewish culture and society from the late middle ages to the present. Focusing upon the different societies in which Jews have lived, the course explores Jewish responses to the political, socio-economic, and cultural challenges of modernity.Topics to be covered include the political emancipation of Jews, the creation of new religious movements within Judaism, Jewish socialism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and the emergence of new Jewish communities in Israel and the United States. No prior background in Jewish history is expected. HIST1710403, JWST1710403, RELS1710403 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0360-404 Jews in the Modern World R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM This course offers an intensive survey of the major currents in Jewish culture and society from the late middle ages to the present. Focusing upon the different societies in which Jews have lived, the course explores Jewish responses to the political, socio-economic, and cultural challenges of modernity.Topics to be covered include the political emancipation of Jews, the creation of new religious movements within Judaism, Jewish socialism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and the emergence of new Jewish communities in Israel and the United States. No prior background in Jewish history is expected. HIST1710404, JWST1710404, RELS1710404 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
NELC 0365-401 How to Read the Bible Steven Phillip Weitzman TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The aim of this course is to explore what the Bible means, and why it means such different things to different people. Why do people find different kinds of meaning in the Bible. Who is right in the struggle over its meaning, and how does one go about deciphering that meaning in the first place? Focusing on the book of Genesis, this seminar seeks to help students answer these questions by introducing some of the many ways in which the Bible has been read over the ages. exploring its meaning as understood by ancient Jews and Christians, modern secular scholars, contemporary fiction writers, feminist activists, philosophers and other kinds of interpreter. JWST1130401, RELS1130401 Arts & Letters Sector
NELC 0375-401 Women in Jewish Literature Kathryn Hellerstein TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM "Jewish woman, who knows your life? In darkness you have come, in darkness do you go." J. L. Gordon (1890). This course will bring into the light the long tradition of women as readers, writers, and subjects in Jewish literature. All texts will be in translation from Yiddish and Hebrew, or in English. Through a variety of genres -- devotional literature, memoir, fiction, and poetry -- we will study women's roles and selves, the relations of women and men, and the interaction between Jewish texts and women's lives. The legacy of women in Yiddish devotional literature will serve as background for our reading of modern Jewish fiction and poetry from the past century. The course is divided into five segments. The first presents a case study of the Matriarchs Rachel and Leah, as they are portrayed in the Hebrew Bible, in rabbinic commentary, in pre-modern prayers, and in modern poems. We then examine a modern novel that recasts the story of Dinah, Leah's daughter. Next we turn to the seventeenth century Glikl of Hamel, the first Jewish woman memoirist. The third segment focuses on devotional literature for and by women. In the fourth segment, we read modern women poets in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. The course concludes with a fifth segment on fiction written by women in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. GRMN1100401, GSWS1100401, JWST1100401 Arts & Letters Sector
NELC 0400-001 Getting Crusaded Paul M Cobb TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM What did it feel like to get crusaded? In this course, we will examine the roughly two-century period from the call of the First Crusade in 1095 to the final expulsion of Latin Crusaders from the Middle East in 1291. Our examination will be primarily from the perspective of the invaded, rather than the invaders, as is usually done. How did the Muslims, Jews, and Eastern Christians of the medieval Middle East respond to the presence of Frankish invaders from Europe? History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NELC0400001
NELC 0450-401 Warriors, Concubines & Converts: the Ottoman Empire in the Middle East & Europe Oscar Aguirre Mandujano MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM For almost six hundred years, the Ottomans ruled most of the Balkans and the Middle East. From their bases in Anatolia, Ottoman armies advanced into the Balkans, Syria, Egypt, and Iraq, constantly challenging the borders of neighboring European and Islamicate empires. By the end of the seventeenth century, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Cairo, Baghdad, Sarajevo, Budapest, and nearly Vienna came under Ottoman rule. As the empire expanded into Europe and the Middle East, the balance of imperial power shifted from warriors to converts, concubines, and intellectuals. This course examines the expansion of the Ottoman sultanate from a local principality into a sprawling empire with a sophisticated bureaucracy; it also investigates the social, cultural, and intellectual developments that accompanied the long arc of the empire's rise and fall. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify and discuss major currents of change in the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East. The student will have a better understanding of the roles of power, ideology, diplomacy, and gender in the construction of empire and a refined appreciation for diverse techniques of historical analysis. HIST0310401 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0460-401 First-Year Seminar: Of Horses, Bows and Fermented Milk: the Turkish Empire in 15 Objects Oscar Aguirre Mandujano MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM The empires of the Turkic and Turkish peoples have stretched across much of Eurasia since before the Common Era until the twentieth century. We first hear of them in Chinese chroniclers’ tales of a powerful people in the wilderness. Greek historians, Byzantine writers, and Arab polymaths write about the empires of the steppes. Centuries later, the heirs of the heroes of these empires move south and west, establishing empires and tribal confederations beyond the steppe, in Central Asia, Anatolia, and the Middle East. The Turkic empires seem to appear in the periphery of many civilizations, challenging, and, one could say, enriching their borders. But looking at a map, is really more than a half of Eurasia a periphery? If we flip the map, could we say these historians were writing from the margins of the Turkish empires? This course introduces the student to the history of empire by following the various histories of Turkic and Turkish people through 15 objects. It discusses the questions of periphery, borders, and the divide between agrarian, pastoral, and nomadic societies. The student will learn to derive historical questions and hypothesis through the intensive study of material culture, literature, and historical writing tracing the long and diverse history of the bow, the saddle, dumplings, and fermented milk (among others) across Eurasia. HIST0061401 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
NELC 0600-301 The Middle East through Many Lenses Heather Sharkey M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This first-year seminar introduces the contemporary Middle East by drawing upon cutting-edge studies written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. These include history, political science, and anthropology, as well as studies of mass media, sexuality, religion, urban life, and the environment. We will spend the first few weeks of the semester surveying major trends in modern Middle Eastern history. We will spend subsequent weeks intensively discussing assigned readings along with documentary films that we will watch in class. The semester will leave students with both a foundation in Middle Eastern studies and a sense of current directions in the field. Humanties & Social Science Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0615-401 Modern Arabic Literature: Palestine and its Diaspora in Film and Literature Ahmad Almallah TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is a study of modern Arabic literary forms in the context of the major political and social changes which shaped Arab history in the first half of the twentieth century. The aim of the course is to introduce students to key samples of modern Arabic literature which trace major social and political developments in Arab society. Each time the class will be offered with a focus on one of the literary genres which emerged or flourished in the twentieth century: the free verse poem, the prose-poem, drama, the novel, and the short story. We will study each of these emergent genres against the socio-political backdrop which informed it. All readings will be in English translations. The class will also draw attention to the politics of translation as a reading and representational lens. COML0615401, NELC6505401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0650-401 History of the Middle East Since 1800 Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet TR 1:45 PM-2:44 PM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST0360401 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
NELC 0650-402 History of the Middle East Since 1800 F 10:15 AM-11:14 AM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST0360402 Cross Cultural Analysis
History & Tradition Sector
NELC 0650-403 History of the Middle East Since 1800 F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST0360403 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0650-404 History of the Middle East Since 1800 R 5:15 PM-6:14 PM A survey of the modern Middle East with special emphasis on the experiences of ordinary men and women as articulated in biographies, novels, and regional case studies. Issues covered include the collapse of empires and the rise of a new state system following WWI, and the roots and consequences of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian revolution and the U.S.-Iraq War. Themes include: the colonial encounter with Europe and the emergence of nationalist movements, the relationship between state and society, economic development and international relations, and religion and cultural identity. HIST0360404 History & Tradition Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 0910-401 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory Katherine M Moore MW 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH1480401, CLST1302401 Humanties & Social Science Sector
NELC 0910-402 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory R 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH1480402, CLST1302402 Humanties & Social Science Sector
NELC 0910-403 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory R 3:30 PM-4:29 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH1480403, CLST1302403 Humanties & Social Science Sector
NELC 0910-404 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory F 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH1480404, CLST1302404 Humanties & Social Science Sector
NELC 0910-405 Food and Fire: Archaeology in the Laboratory F 1:45 PM-2:44 PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory. ANTH1480405, CLST1302405 Humanties & Social Science Sector
NELC 1100-401 History of Ancient Egypt Josef W Wegner TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Review and discussion of the principal aspects of ancient Egyptian history, 3000-500 BC. NELC6100401 Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 1310-401 Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature: Short Story Reinvented Nili R Gold W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM The objective of this course is to develop an artistic appreciation for literature through in-depth class discussions and text analysis. Readings are comprised of Israeli poetry and short stories. Students examine how literary language expresses psychological and cultural realms. The course covers topics such as: the short story reinvented, literature and identity, and others. Because the content of this course changes from year to year, students may take it for credit more than once. This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.Grading is based primarily on participation and students' literary understanding. COML1311401, JWST1310401, NELC5400401 Cross Cultural Analysis
Arts & Letters Sector
https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NELC1310401
NELC 1710-401 Modern Iran and the West Through the Lens of Fiction Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili M 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This undergraduate level course explores key tropes and themes of Iranian modernity through a close reading of Persian novel, short story, travelogue, and memoir. Various literary genres from social realism, to surrealism, magic realism, naturalism, and absurd literature will be introduced with specific reference to Iran's literature and in light of literary theory of novel. This course does not require any prior knowledge of Persian language and literature. Throughout the course, we will be particularly concerned with the relationship between Persian fiction and the West. We will investigate this curious relationship through themes of gender, religion, politics, and war. COML2017401, GSWS2130401 Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 1960-401 Narrative Across Cultures Ania Loomba MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The purpose of this course is to present a variety of narrative genres and to discuss and illustrate the modes whereby they can be analyzed. We will be looking at shorter types of narrative: short stories, novellas, and fables, and also some extracts from longer works such as autobiographies. While some works will come from the Anglo-American tradition, a larger number will be selected from European and non-Western cultural traditions and from earlier time-periods. The course will thus offer ample opportunity for the exploration of the translation of cultural values in a comparative perspective. COML1025401, ENGL0039401, SAST1124401, THAR1025401 Arts & Letters Sector
Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 2000-401 Aleppo Paul M Cobb TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The Syrian city of Aleppo is the oldest continually-inhabited settlement on the planet, situated at the intersection of routes connecting Asia, the Middle East, and the West. In the wake of the Syrian civil war, however, much of the city has been, it seems, utterly destroyed. While questions haunt us about the city's future, this seminar investigates Aleppo's past. Weekly readings and discussions will be organized as a "biography" of the city, culminating in a seminar paper on any aspect of Aleppo's history, from the Bronze Age, to the Hellenistic period, the Islamic Middle Ages, and the present day. NELC6000401 Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 2140-401 Tutankhamun’s Tomb: Its Treasures and Significance David P Silverman TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course examines the short life of the young boy king and what the discovery of his tomb and its contents mean in terms of Egypt’s long history and accomplishments. AAMW6141401, AFRC2140401, AFRC6140401, NELC6140401
NELC 2565-401 Silencing: Voices of Dissent in the Middle East Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet R 3:30 PM-6:29 PM The Middle East boasts a rich and vibrant literary tradition. At the same time, modern Middle Eastern literature has incorporated innovative techniques to produce unique literary forms that give meaning to the contemporary circumstances of the region. This course will survey this literary history as a window through which to observe and understand Middle Eastern society. We will begin by reading excerpts from classical texts, since these works resonate strongly in contemporary Middle Eastern culture. Next, we will read Middle Eastern novels from various countries and different eras. The last part of the course will focus on memoirs that shed light on wars and conflicts through personal reflections. We will use literary works (epic poetry, novels, memoirs) as historical texts and analyze the social milieux in which these works emerged. HIST2351401 Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 2705-401 Media and Culture in Contemporary Iran Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the culture and media of modern Iran, with a critical perspective on issues such as identity formation, ethnicity, race, and nation-building. It focuses on how these issues relate to various aspects of modern Iranian culture -- such as religion, gender, sexuality, war, and migration -- through the lens of media, cinema, and literature. CIMS2705401, GSWS2705401, NELC6700401, RELS2180401
NELC 2920-401 World Heritage in Global Conflict Lynn M Meskell W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Heritage is always political. Such a statement might refer to the everyday politics of local stakeholder interests on one end of the spectrum, or the volatile politics of destruction and erasure of heritage during conflict, on the other. If heritage is always political then one might expect that the workings of World Heritage might be especially fraught given the international dimension. In particular, the intergovernmental system of UNESCO World Heritage must navigate the inherent tension between state sovereignty and nationalist interests and the wider concerns of a universal regime. The World Heritage List has almost 1200 properties has many such contentious examples, including sites in Iraq, Mali, Syria, Crimea, Palestine, Armenia and Cambodia. As an organization UNESCO was born of war with an explicit mission to end global conflict and help the world rebuild materially and morally yet has found its own history increasingly entwined with that of international politics and violence. ANTH2840401, ANTH5840401, CLST3319401, HSPV5840401
NELC 2960-401 Material World in Archaeological Science Marie-Claude Boileau
Deborah I Olszewski
Vanessa Workman
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. Class will take place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization. ANTH2221401, ANTH5221401, ARTH0221401, CLST3302401, NELC6920401
NELC 3950-401 Intro to Digital Archaeology Jason Herrmann MW 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Students in this course will be exposed to the broad spectrum of digital approaches in archaeology with an emphasis on fieldwork, through a survey of current literature and applied learning opportunities that focus on African American mortuary landscapes of greater Philadelphia. As an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) course, we will work with stakeholders from cemetery companies, historic preservation advocacy groups, and members of the African Methodist Episcopal Church to collect data from three field sites. We will then use these data to reconstruct the original plans, untangle site taphonomy, and assess our results for each site. Our results will be examined within the broader constellation of threatened and lost African American burial grounds and our interpretations will be shared with community stakeholders using digital storytelling techniques. This course can count toward the minor in Digital Humanities, minor in Archaeological Science and the Graduate Certificate in Archaeological Science. AAMW5620401, ANTH3307401, ANTH5220401, CLST3307401, CLST5620401
NELC 4110-001 The Archaeology of Nubia Josef W Wegner W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM The course will examine the archaeology of Ancient Nubia from Pre-history through the Bronze and Iron Ages, ca. 5000 BCE to 300 AD. The course will focus on the various Nubian cultures of the Middle Nile, and social and cultural development, along with a detailed examination of the major archaeological sites and central issues of Nubian archaeology. Cross Cultural Analysis
NELC 4305-401 Spirit and Law Talya Fishman MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM While accepting "the yoke of the commandments", Jewish thinkers from antiquity onward have perennially sought to make the teachings of revelation more meaningful in their own lives. Additional impetus for this quest has come from overtly polemical challenges to the law, such as those leveled by Paul, medieval Aristotelians, Spinoza and Kant. This course explores both the critiques of Jewish Law, and Jewish reflections on the Law's meaning and purpose, by examining a range of primary sources within their intellectual and historical contexts. Texts (in English translation) include selections from Midrash, Talmud, medieval Jewish philosophy and biblical exegesis, kabbalah, Hasidic homilies, Jewish responses to the Enlightenment, and contemporary attempts to re-value and invent Jewish rituals. JWST4305401, RELS4305401 Cross Cultural Analysis https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NELC4305401
NELC 5210-401 Great Books of Judaism: Medieval Jewish Bookshelf Talya Fishman MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The Babylonian Talmud, known simply as the Bavli, is the foundational legal and ethical document of rabbinic Judaism. It is one of the best read works of world literature, and it is the most widely disseminated and revered rabbinic work. It not only contains legal discussions and rulings but rather it also presents the worldview of the rabbis. This course will analyze and contextualize the perspectives of the Talmud towards the important phases of life. We will examine in-depth several Talmudic passages relating to the various stages of the human lifecycle: birth and naming of the child; circumcision; bar/bat mitzva and adulthood; earning a livelihood and choosing a career; marriage and divorce; procreation and raising children; death, burial, mourning and the belief in the resurrection of the dead among others. We will evaluate these teachings in light of other traditions and in their broader late antiquity and contemporary contexts. All texts will be read in their English translation but originals will also be provided. JWST0305401, NELC0305401, RELS0305401
NELC 5400-401 Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature: Short Story Reinvented Nili R Gold W 5:15 PM-8:14 PM The objective of this course is to develop an artistic appreciation for literature through in-depth class discussions and text analysis. Readings are comprised of Israeli poetry and short stories. Students examine how literary language expresses psychological and cultural realms. The course covers topics such as: the short story reinvented, literature and identity, and others. Because the content of this course changes from year to year, students may take it for credit more than once. This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.Grading is based primarily on participation and students' literary understanding. COML1311401, JWST1310401, NELC1310401
NELC 6000-401 Aleppo Paul M Cobb TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The Syrian city of Aleppo is the oldest continually-inhabited settlement on the planet, situated at the intersection of routes connecting Asia, the Middle East, and the West. In the wake of the Syrian civil war, however, much of the city has been, it seems, utterly destroyed. While questions haunt us about the city's future, this seminar investigates Aleppo's past. Weekly readings and discussions will be organized as a "biography" of the city, culminating in a seminar paper on any aspect of Aleppo's history, from the Bronze Age, to the Hellenistic period, the Islamic Middle Ages, and the present day. NELC2000401
NELC 6100-401 History of Ancient Egypt Josef W Wegner TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Review and discussion of the principal aspects of ancient Egyptian history, 3000-500 BC. NELC1100401
NELC 6140-401 Tutankhamun’s Tomb: Its Treasures and Significance David P Silverman TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course examines the short life of the young boy king and what the discovery of his tomb and its contents mean in terms of Egypt’s long history and accomplishments. AAMW6141401, AFRC2140401, AFRC6140401, NELC2140401
NELC 6500-301 Seminar in Selected Topics in Arabic Literature Huda Fakhreddine W 12:00 PM-2:59 PM This is the graduate seminar course in which a variety of aspects of Arabic literature studies are covered at the advanced graduate level. Students in this course are expected to be able to read large amounts of literature in Arabic on a weekly basis and to be able to discuss them critically during the class itself. Topics are chosen to reflect student interest. Recent topics have included: 1001 NIGHTS; the short story; the novel; MAQAMAT; classical ADAB prose; the drama; the novella; modern Arabic poetry. https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=NELC6500301
NELC 6505-401 Modern Arabic Literature: Palestine and its Diaspora in Film and Literature Ahmad Almallah TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM This course is a study of modern Arabic literary forms in the context of the major political and social changes which shaped Arab history in the first half of the twentieth century. The aim of the course is to introduce students to key samples of modern Arabic literature which trace major social and political developments in Arab society. Each time the class will be offered with a focus on one of the literary genres which emerged or flourished in the twentieth century: the free verse poem, the prose-poem, drama, the novel, and the short story. We will study each of these emergent genres against the socio-political backdrop which informed it. All readings will be in English translations. The class will also draw attention to the politics of translation as a reading and representational lens. COML0615401, NELC0615401
NELC 6560-401 Religion and the Visual Image: Seeing is Believing Jamal J Elias W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM Seeing is Believing engages in a historical, theoretical, and cross-cultural analysis of the place of visuality in religion and of religion in visual culture. We will examine images, buildings, places, objects, performances and events. The geographical, cultural and historical scope of the material is broad, including subjects from Europe, the Islamic World, non-Muslim South Asia, the US and Latin America from the medieval period until the present. Theoretical works will be read in conjunction with representative examples to invite intellectual engagement in a socially and historically grounded way. Important issues to be covered include the relationship of visual to material culture; visual theories versus theories of vision; locating religion in human sensory experience; perception at individual and collective levels; authentics, fakes and simulacra; iconoclasm and image veneration; aesthetics, use and utility; and things. RELS5410401, SAST5410401
NELC 6700-401 Media and Culture in Contemporary Iran Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili W 1:45 PM-4:44 PM This course offers a comprehensive introduction to the culture and media of modern Iran, with a critical perspective on issues such as identity formation, ethnicity, race, and nation-building. It focuses on how these issues relate to various aspects of modern Iranian culture - such as religion, gender, sexuality, war, and migration - through the lens of media, cinema, and literature. CIMS2705401, GSWS2705401, NELC2705401, RELS2180401
NELC 6920-401 Material World in Archaeological Science Marie-Claude Boileau
Deborah I Olszewski
Vanessa Workman
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. Class will take place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization. ANTH2221401, ANTH5221401, ARTH0221401, CLST3302401, NELC2960401
PERS 0100-401 Elementary Persian I Mahyar Entezari TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
W 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
This course is designed to help you start learning Persian and to give you the necessary tools to continue your study of Persian. This course introduces the Persian alphabet alongside grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. The four language skills (i.e., listening, speaking, reading and writing) as well as pronunciation and culture are integrated into the curriculum. There is no prerequisite. PERS5100401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PERS0100401
PERS 0300-401 Intermediate Persian I Mahyar Entezari TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is conducted in Persian and designed to help you continue expanding upon what you have learned in Elementary Persian II. In this course, we will begin to address a broader variety of cultural topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore use of English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students must either have successfully completed Elementary Persian II or take the departmental placement exam. PERS5300401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PERS0300401
PERS 0390-680 Persian for Heritage Speakers I Mahyar Entezari TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Persian for Heritage Speakers is conducted in Persian and designed to help you strengthen your skills by learning not only to read and write, but also to engage in more complex forms of discourse in Persian. In this course, we will begin to address a variety of topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore, English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Prerequisite: Students must be proficient in spoken Persian (whether Farsi or Dari), and lack reading and writing skills. PERS5101680 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PERS0390680
PERS 2000-680 Advanced Persian I Azita Hamedani Kamkar MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM A continuation of Intermediate Persian II, students will advance their skills in reading and listening, as well as in writing and speaking. PERS6200680
PERS 5100-401 Elementary Persian I Mahyar Entezari TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM
W 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
This course is designed to help you start learning Persian and to give you the necessary tools to continue your study of Persian. This course introduces the Persian alphabet alongside grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. The four language skills (i.e., listening, speaking, reading and writing) as well as pronunciation and culture are integrated into the curriculum. There is no prerequisite. PERS0100401
PERS 5101-680 Persian for Heritage Speakers I Mahyar Entezari TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Persian for Heritage Speakers is conducted in Persian and designed to help you strengthen your skills by learning not only to read and write, but also to engage in more complex forms of discourse in Persian. In this course, we will begin to address a variety of topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore, English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Prerequisite: Students must be proficient in spoken Persian (whether Farsi or Dari), and lack reading and writing skills. Placement test or instructor permission required. PERS0390680 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202230&c=PERS5101680
PERS 5300-401 Intermediate Persian I Mahyar Entezari TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course is conducted in Persian and designed to help you continue expanding upon what you have learned in Elementary Persian II (PERS-012). In this course, we will begin to address a broader variety of cultural topics in order to increase your proficiency in linguistic as well as cultural terms. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication. Therefore use of English is restricted. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are integrated into the course, as are culture, grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Students must either have successfully completed Elementary Persian II at the graduate level, or take the departmental placement exam. PERS0300401
PERS 5550-680 Introduction to Kurdish Azita Hamedani Kamkar MW 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Introduction to Kurdish is an introductory-level course designed to help you start learning Kurdish and to give you the necessary tools to continue your study of Kurdish language. This course introduces the Kurdish alphabet (Arabic script) alongside grammar and vocabulary. Toward the end of the semester, the course will also involve some Kurdish classical and modern poetry. Emphasis is placed on actively using the language for interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. The four language skills (i.e., listening, speaking, reading, and writing) as well as pronunciation and culture are integrated into the curriculum. There is no prerequisite. The course will focus on a variety of Kurdish dialects as well.
PERS 6200-680 Advanced Persian I Azita Hamedani Kamkar MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM A continuation of Intermediate Persian II, students will advance their skills in reading and listening, as well as in writing and speaking. Graduate students may have additional assignments. PERS2000680
TURK 0100-401 Elementary Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 12:00 PM-1:59 PM This is a course for beginners who have no previous knowledge of Turkish. Using a communicative approach, Elementary Turkish introduces basic vocabulary and grammar rules and focuses on building language competencies in listening, reading, speaking and writing. By the end of the course, students will be able to participate in simple conversations, to know daily expressions, and will understand simple dialogues in day-to-day context and will be able to count and tell time. Will be able to speak about events that happened in the past and express plans for the future. Students will also develop writing strategies that will allow them to write simple letters and fill in commonly-used forms. TURK5100401
TURK 0300-401 Intermediate Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM A continuation of elementary Turkish, with emphasis on grammar and reading. This course is for students who have previous knowledge of Turkish or students who have completed Elementary Turkish I and II. This course is designed to improve students' writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in Turkish. Students' Turkish language proficiency and cultural awareness and knowledge will increase by exposing to autentic materials and coursework. and in order give them cultural knowledge, students are exposed to authentic materials. TURK5300401
TURK 4200-680 Advanced Turkish Culture & Media I Feride Servet Hatiboglu T 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is for students who are from all different levels of Turkish knowledge. They are expected to write and talk about Turkish movies, culture, politics according to their own level and pace. They will talk to Turkish visitors and interview them. Turkish movies will be the part of the course and once a month, students will watch a Turkish movie and analyze it. Discussions will take place and students will write essays about the movie. This course is designed with a technology-rich, project based approach. The materials will go beyond instruction in grammar and vocabulary to support the acquisition of socio-cultural pragmatics, and intercultural learning. TURK5800680
TURK 5100-401 Elementary Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 12:00 PM-1:59 PM This is a course for graduate students who have no previous knowledge of Turkish. Using a communicative approach, Elementary Turkish introduces basic vocabulary and grammar rules and focuses on building language competencies in listening, reading, speaking and writing. By the end of the course, students will be able to participate in simple conversations, to know daily expressions, and will understand simple dialogues in day-to-day context and will be able to count and tell time. Will be able to speak about events that happened in the past and express plans for the future. Students will also develop writing strategies that will allow them to write simple letters and fill in commonly-used forms. TURK0100401
TURK 5300-401 Intermediate Turkish I Feride Servet Hatiboglu TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM A continuation of elementary Turkish, with emphasis on grammar and reading. This course is for students who have previous knowledge of Turkish or students who have completed Elementary Turkish I and II. This course is designed to improve students' writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in Turkish. Students' Turkish language proficiency and cultural awareness and knowledge will increase by exposing to autentic materials and coursework. and in order give them cultural knowledge, students are exposed to authentic materials. TURK0300401
TURK 5800-680 Advanced Turkish Culture & Media I Feride Servet Hatiboglu T 5:15 PM-7:14 PM This course is for students who are from all different levels of Turkish knowledge. They are expected to write and talk about Turkish movies, culture, politics according to their own level and pace. They will talk to Turkish visitors and interview them. Turkish movies will be the part of the course and once a month, students will watch a Turkish movie and analyze it. Discussions will take place and students will write essays about the movie. This course is designed with a technology-rich, project based approach. The materials will go beyond instruction in grammar and vocabulary to support the acquisition of socio-cultural pragmatics, and intercultural learning. TURK4200680
TURK 6500-680 Elementary Uzbek I MW 5:15 PM-7:14 PM Designed to cover beginning college levels of language instruction, Uzbek: An Elementary Textbook provides learners and instructors with a wide selection of materials and task-oriented activities to facilitate the development of language learning. It offers a thematically organized and integrative approach to the Uzbek language and its culture, including a functional approach to grammar, an emphasis on integrated skills development, and the use of authentic materials such as videos filmed in various regions of Uzbekistan.Uzbek: An Elementary Textbook contains one CD-ROM that includes authentic audio and video materials to accompany the text and integrated, interactive exercises and games, all in Flash format and all of which are keyed to the textbook. It includes a supplementary Cyrillic reader, an extensive glossary, and four-color illustrations and photographs throughout.